22 Mid-Century Modern Kitchen Ideas (Photos)

You gotta love the sleek and nostalgic mid-century style. I sure do and that's why I had so much fun putting together this sleek collection of mid-century modern kitchen designs.
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Welcome to our collection of mid-century modern kitchen designs.  Check out various kitchens found in fabulous mid-century modern houses below.

Photos

Related: All kitchen designs

See the rest of this home here. Source: Redfin

See entire home here. Source: Redfin

See entire home here. Source: Redfin


See entire home here. Source: Redfin

See entire home here. Source: Redfin

See entire home here. Source: Redfin

See the rest of this home here. Source: Redfin


View entire home here. Via: Redfin

View entire home here. Via: Redfin

View entire home here. Via: Redfin

See entire home here. Source: Redfin


See the rest of this home here. Source: Redfin

View entire home here. Via: Redfin

See the rest of this home here.


Mid-century modern designs allowed interior designers and furniture makers to be creative in their use of material and color. Their designs were considered futuristic at the time and may have been heavily influenced by science fiction novels and movies, which were very popular during the mid-1900s. Here are some of the mid-century kitchen ideas you can use in your home.

Mid-Century Designs

Mid-century interior designs become popular around the late 1930s to the mid-1960s. The design style features clean lines, geometric shapes, and a mixture of organic and synthetic materials. As more synthetics were invented by chemical companies, they became widely used in furnishings and construction materials during the mid-20th century.

Mid-Century Materials

Even though wood was still a popular material for construction and furnishings, the development of synthetics like nylon, polypropylene, and plastic laminate changed how things were made. Formica, which is a brand name for plastic laminate, began using it to build counter and tabletops. Chrome dining sets with Formica tabletops and vinyl covered chairs are typical of mid-century designs.

Some people use laminate in their kitchens today, but it isn’t very popular. In a recent kitchen survey, only 15, 919 kitchens 616, 632 had laminate in them. This lack of use is reflective of the use of mid-century designs since only 0.77% of over 1.78 million kitchens have this design style.

Organic wood furniture is reflective of the mid-century as most furnishings were created from oak, walnut, rosewood, and teak. Its style is very distinctive because many of the wood pieces were boxy.

This shape was in juxtaposition to many chairs, light shades, and other accessories, which were curvy, or rounded. Chairs were often made from curvy metal or plastic frames, padded seating and metal bases.

Warm Earth Tones

To further imitate mid-century designs, a variety of color should be instrumental in the kitchen. White and black kitchens are reflective of mid-century kitchens, but warm citrus colors like warm yellow, orange, olive green, and chartreuse are found in mid-century homes.

Minimalistic Style

Mid-century designs are also well-known for their minimalist appearance. Everything always appears clean, neat, and there is very little clutter on counters, tables, and minimal art or decorations on the walls.

Some of the fun of decorating in a mid-century style is finding vintage or retro-style pieces in antique or second-hand stores for your kitchen.

Return to all mid-century modern homes.








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