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50 Best Scottish Castles and Manor Houses (Photos)

Here they are... the 50 best castles in Scotland. This collection is mind-blowing. Photos for each. For the truly spectacular, multiple photos. You'll love these castle structures - ruins and structures still in use today.
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Welcome to our collection of the 50 best castles and manor houses in Scotland. Scotland is also well known for its castles. Many are incredibly old; the country has many in ruins but also many are still in use.

Included in this gallery are grand manor houses with a lot of history too. Enjoy.

Abbotsford House

Abbotsford

A historic country house in the Scottish Borders, near Melrose, Abbotsford is a historic country house and the former residence of historical novelist and poet, Sir Walter Scott. After his death in 1832, Abbotsford became a popular tourist attraction. Sir Scott worked very hard to maintain Abbotsford in his ownership after near-bankruptcy in 1825.

About the Abbotsford

  • Where: Melrose, Scotland
  • When: 19th century
  • Who built it: Sir Walter Scott
  • Style: Scottish Baronial style
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction
  • Current owner: Scott Family
Ballindalloch Castle

Ballindalloch Castle

Ballindalloch Castle

Ballindalloch Castle

known as the “pearl of the north”, the Ballindalloch Castle located in Banffshire, Scotland has been the family home of Macpherson-Grants since 1546. It was built in 1546 and has been succeeded by many generations of the family ever since. It was plundered and burned by James Graham, the first Marquess of Montrose, however, the Macpherson-Grants family resisted and restored the estate in 1645. The castle is still the residence of the Russell and Macpherson-Grant families up to this date, and the castle is open during summer months for the tourists.

About the Ballindalloch Castle

  • Where: Banffshire, Scotland
  • When: 1546
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Private residence / Tourist attraction
  • Current owner: Macpherson-Grants Family

Located in Caithness, on the north coast of Scotland, the Castle of Mey was built at the behest of George, the 4th Earl of Caithness, for his second son William Sinclair. In 1573, William was murdered by his older brother John after William found out that John was planning a prison escape after being imprisoned by their own father. After killing his own brother, John would later on assassinated as well, and the castle went on to their youngest brother, George Sinclair, who founded the family of the Sinclairs of Mey and changed the castle’s name into Barrogill Castle. George’s successors would rule the castle later on as the official seat of the Earls of Caithness for the next one hundred years. In 1819, the castle underwent to major alterations following the orders of the twelfth Earl who commissioned architect William Burn to do the work. The ruling period of the Earls over the castle ended when the fifteenth Earl died without a single heir. The castle would later on sold to different owners and found itself serving Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother in 1952. The castle’s poor state would later on renovated and restored by Her Majesty between 1953 and 1955. After Her Majesty’s death in 2002, the property was turned over to the Queen Elizabeth Castle of Mey Trust, which has opened the castle and garden to the public.

About the Barrogill Castle / Castle of Mey

  • Where: Caithness, Scotland
  • When: 16th century
  • Who built it: George, the 4th Earl of Caithness
  • Style: Tudor Gothic style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: Castle of Mey Trust
Blackness Castle

Blackness Castle

A 15th-century fortress, near the village of Blackness, Scotland, the Blackness Castle was built on the site of an earlier fort built by Sir George Crichton, Lord High Admiral of Scotland in the 1440s. At this time, Blackness serves as the main post of the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow, one of the main residences of the Scottish monarch. When Sir George was governor of Stirling Castle, his cousin William Crichton, Chancellor of Scotland was murdered by the King. At this time Sir George ordered the construction of Blackness resulting to the destruction of his tower at Barnton in Edinburgh in 1444. In 1453, Sir George Crichton handed over the Crichton lands, including Blackness Castle, to James II and became a royal fortress continuing to serve as a prison, and was put into the care of a keeper, who was often the Sheriff of Linlithgow. The castle served as a prison for a long period of time until it returned to being one of four Scottish fortresses to be maintained and garrisoned by the British Army during the Union of Scotland and England. It once again returned to serving as a prison, holding French prisoners of war during the series of conflicts of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, including the Seven Years’ War and the Napoleonic Wars. Today, it is a Scheduled Ancient Monument maintained by Historic Scotland.

About the Blackness Castle

  • Where: Blackness, Scotland
  • When: 15th century
  • Who built it: Sir George Crichton, Lord High Admiral of Scotland
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist Attraction
  • Current owner: Historic Scotland
Blair Castle

Blair Castle

Blair Castle

Blair Castle

Blair Castle is a category A listed building built in 1269 by John I Comyn, Lord of Badenoch. During the Wars of the Three Kingdoms of the 17th century, the family occupying the Blair Castle, the Murrays supported the Royalist cause and was taken by Oliver Cromwell’s army following his invasion of 1650. Lord John Murray sieged the castle where Viscount Dundee at that time currently stays. Viscount Dundee refused to retreat and surrender the castle resulting to his death, however, Lord John Murray lost the battle and could not retake the castle. It was abandoned by the Jacobites later on and was retaken by the Murrays once again, however, Iain Murray, 10th Duke of Atholl died in 1996 and placed Blair Castle and most of his estates in a charitable trust.

About the Blair Castle

  • Where: Blackness, Scotland
  • When: 1269
  • Who built it: John I Comyn, Lord of Badenoch
  • Style: Scottish Baronial style
  • What is it now? Tourist Attraction / Open for tourists
  • Current owner: Blair Charitable Trust
Blair Drummond house

Blair Drummond House

Originally built in 1715, the Blair Drummond House was purchased by Sir John Kay, a tea merchant from Glasgow in 1916. He had no children so passed the property to his nephew Sir John Muir. His grandson, the property’s present owner Jamie Muir sold the house to the Camphill Movement, a charity that cares for people with special needs and is now a home for adults with learning disabilities. Jamie Muir then built another Blair Drummond House, calling it the Blair Drummond Safari Park. With the help of Jimmy Chipperfield, the park was opened in 1970 and became Britain’s second-ever safari parks, with Longleat Safari Park being the first.

About the Blair Drummond House

  • Where: Stirling, Scotland
  • When: 1715
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Neo-Gothic style
  • What is it now? Home for adults with learning disabilities
  • Current owner: Camphill Movement
Braemar Castle

Braemar Castle

Braemar Castle

Braemar Castle

Situated near the village of Braemar in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, the Braemar Castle was by the Earl of Mar in 1628 and has been their hunting lodge, fortress, garrison and family home. The castle was purchased by John Farquharson, 9th Laird of Invercauld from the Earls of Mar, but was left in ruins until 1748. In 1831, the castle was returned to the Farquharson clan by the withdrawing military garrison of Hanoverian troops. After that, the castle was restored at the order of 12th Laird of Invercauld. Today, the castle is being maintained by the Braemar Community Ltd and is open to the public.

About the Braemar Castle

  • Where: Braemar, Scotland
  • When: 1628
  • Who built it: John Erskine, Earl of Mar
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: Braemar Community Ltd
Brodick Castle

Brodick Castle

The Brodick Castle was originally built as a defensive fortress in the 15th century. It was destroyed and was granted by James III to his brother-in-law, James Hamilton, 1st Lord Hamilton. The ruined castle was then rebuilt by the Earl of Arran in the form of a tower house. The castle would be the target of simultaneous attacks and sieges in the following years until the 17th century when the castle was used as a base for hunting excursions instead. In the 19th century, William Hamilton, 11th Duke of Hamilton used the castle as his residence. His son, William Douglas-Hamilton, 12th Duke of Hamilton succeeded the castle but had no male heirs to replace him as the castle’s lord, so he passed the rights to his distant cousin Alfred Douglas-Hamilton, who entailed the castle upon his only daughter the Lady Mary Louise Douglas-Hamilton. She married James Graham, 6th Duke of Montrose in 1906, ending the long reign of the Hamiltons as the Brodick Castle’s lords. Today, the castle and gardens were acquired by the National Trust for Scotland and were opened to the public.

About the Brodick Castle

  • Where: Brodick, Scotland
  • When: 15th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Gothic style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Brodie castle

Brodie Castle

Located in Moray, Scotland, the Brodie Castle is a Category A listed building built in 1567 by Clan Brodie. It was destroyed by a huge fire in 1645, and was restored in 1824 by architect William Burn in the Scots Baronial style. Currently owned by the National Trust for Scotland, the castle is open to the public.

About the Brodie Castle

  • Where: Moray, Scotland
  • When: 1567
  • Who built it: Clan Brodie
  • Style: Gothic style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Caerlaverock Castle

Caerlaverock Castle

A moated triangular castle first built in the 13th century, the Caerlaverock Castle was a stronghold of the Maxwell family from the 13th century until the 17th century when the castle was abandoned. It underwent partial demolitions and reconstructions throughout the years after the Wars of Scottish Independence. Today, it serves as a popular tourist attraction and a protected scheduled monument under the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

About the Caerlaverock Castle

  • Where: Caerlaverock, Scotland
  • When: 13th century
  • Who built it: Maxwell family
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction / Scheduled Monument
  • Current owner: Historic Environment Scotland
Callendar House

Callendar House

The Callendar House has a rich history dating back from the 14th century. It was built in the Gothic style set within the grounds of the historic Callendar Park in Falkirk, Scotland. Its purpose was to serve as the seat of the Callander family who was Thanes of Callander. During the 14th century, the Callendar lands were granted by King David II to Sir William Livingston and in the 18th century, the ownership of the Callender lands was acquired by the William Forbes through an auction. The Forbes family then commissioned the remodeling of the house to French Renaissance style and in the 20th century, the Callendar House was purchased by Falkirk Burgh Council. The house has been administered through Falkirk Community Trust since then but the majority of the estate is still owned by the family company Callendar Estate.

About the Callendar House

  • Where: Falkirk, Scotland
  • When: 14th century
  • Who built it: Callander family / Forbes family
  • Style: Gothic style / French Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Gallery / Museum / Open to the public
  • Current owner: Callendar Estate
Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

The Balmoral Castle was built by Sir William Drummond in 1390. This original castle was rebuilt by Sir Robert Gordon in the late 18th century, transforming it into a baronial-style castle following the design by John Smith of Aberdeen. In 1852, the estate house was privately purchased by Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria. It was a private residence at first, but soon after it was purchased by the royal family, transformed it into a Scottish baronial architecture building designed by William Smith of Aberdeen and then became the official residence of the British royal family.

About the Balmoral Castle

  • Where: Aberdeenshire, Scotland
  • When: 14th century / Reconstructed in the 19th century
  • Who built it: Reconstructed by Prince Albert
  • Style: Scottish Baronial architecture
  • What is it now? British royal family residence
  • Current owner: British royal family
Castle Fraser

Castle Fraser

Castle Fraser

Castle Fraser

Originally known as Muchall-in-Mar, the Castle Fraser is located in Aberdeenshire, Scotland and was built between 1575 and 1636 by the 6th Laird, Michael Fraser. Architects John Smith and William Burn once again reconstructed the castle between 1820 and 1850 at the behest of Charles Fraser. This castle’s purpose was to serve the Lords of Fraser, however, the last male Fraser of the direct line, Frederick Mackenzie Fraser died without a single heir so his widow, Theodora, sold the castle due to the lack of a suitable heir. Weetman Pearson, 1st Viscount Cowdray was the one who bought the castle. After restoring the castle, the Pearson family gave the property to National Trust for Scotland in 1976.

About the Castle Fraser

  • Where: Aberdeenshire, Scotland
  • When: 1575-1636
  • Who built it: 6th Laird, Michael Fraser
  • Style: Tudor architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Castle Stalker

Castle Stalker

The Castle Stalker is one of the best-preserved medieval tower-houses to survive in western Scotland. It is a Category A listed building that originated from a small fort built in the early 14th century by Clan MacDougall who were then Lords of Lorn. In the late 14th century around 1388, the Clan Stewart of Appin took over the Lordship of Lorn and built the present castle during the mid 15th century. They passed the ownership to Clan Campbell, who abandoned the property in 1840 when it lost its roof. The castle was bought by Charles Stewart of Achara in 1908, who made minor repairs before it was acquired by Lt. Col. D. R. Stewart Allward in 1965 who finally made the complete restoration. Currently, the Stalker remains privately owned but still open to the public during the summer.

About the Castle Stalker

  • Where: Appin, Scotland
  • When: 14th century
  • Who built it: Clan MacDougall
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Open to the public during summer
  • Current owner: Private owner
Cawdor Castle

Cawdor Castle

The Cawdor Castle is a category A listed building located in Cawdor. It was built in the 15th century that originally belonged to Clan Cawdor before passing into the hands of Campbells in the 16th century. Cawdor Castle is popular for its literary connection to Macbeth, a tragedy by William Shakespeare in which the title character is made “Thane of Cawdor”.

About the Cawdor Castle

  • Where: Cawdor, Scotland
  • When: 15th century
  • Who built it: Clan Cawdor
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction
  • Current owner: Clan Campbell
Craigievar Castle

Craigievar Castle

A pinkish harled castle in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Craigievar Castle was the seat of Clan Sempill and the Forbes family until 1963 when William Forbes-Sempill, 19th Lord Sempill gave the property to the National Trust for Scotland. The Craigievar Castle was completed in 1626 by the Aberdonian merchant William Forbes in Scottish Baronial architecture. Today, the castle is open to the public.

About the Craigievar Castle

  • Where: Aberdeenshire, Scotland
  • When: 1963
  • Who built it: William Forbes
  • Style: Scottish Baronial architecture
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Crathes castle

Crathes castle

Crathes Castle

Crathes Castle

A 16th-century castle near Banchory in the Aberdeenshire, the Crathes Castle was built by the Burnetts of Leys on the land given as a gift to the Burnett of Leys family by King Robert the Bruce in 1323. The castle served the family for almost 400 years until given to the National Trust for Scotland by the 13th Baronet of Leys, Sir James Burnett in 1951.

About the Crathes Castle

  • Where: Aberdeenshire, Scotland
  • When: 16th century
  • Who built it: Burnett of Leys family
  • Style: Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle was constructed as an L-plan castle by at the behest of the 10th Earl of Cassilis, David Kennedy. He commissioned architect Robert Adam to rebuild a previous country house into a fine seat of his earldom. Culzean Castle was the former home of the Marquess of Ailsa, the chief of Clan Kennedy. The Kennedy family gave the castle and its grounds to the National Trust for Scotland in 1945. The Culzean Castle is known to be home to at least seven ghosts, including a young woman in a ball-gown, a ghostly gray mist and a ghostly piper playing his pipes on the grounds.

About the Culzean Castle

  • Where: Maybole, Scotland
  • When: 1777-1792
  • Who built it: David Kennedy, 10th Earl of Cassilis
  • Style: Baroque architecture
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Dalhousie Castle

Dalhousie Castle

Dalhousie Castle has seen much history. It was a medieval building that originated in the 13th century and was altered in the 16th century. It was the seat of the Earls of Dalhousie, the chieftains of Clan Ramsay that started ruling the castle back in the medieval days. Dalhousie hosted King Edward I when the King was on his way to meet Sir William Wallace at the Battle of Falkirk. Sir Alexander Ramsay withstood a six-month siege at Dalhousie by English forces led by King Henry IV at the start of the 15th century as well. The Ramsay family continued to retain ownership of the castle until 1977 when the seat of Clan Ramsay was moved to Brechin Castle. The castle was turned into a hotel since then.

About the Dalhousie Castle

  • Where: Edinburgh, Scotland
  • When: 16th century
  • Who built it: Clan Ramsay
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Hotel
  • Current owner: Robert Parker
Dornoch Castle

Dornoch Castle

Located in the village of Dornoch, Dornoch Castle was built in the early 16th century to serve as the home of the bishops of Caithness. Bishop Robert Stewart gave the castle to John Gordon, 11th Earl of Sutherland in 1557 as a gift. The castle fell into decay during the 18th century and was restored to serve as a school and jail in 1813–1814. There are many purpose changes in the castle in the following years until it became the current Dornoch Castle Hotel in 1947.

About the Dornoch Castle

  • Where: Dornoch, Scotland
  • When: 16th century
  • Who built it: Bishops of Caithness
  • Style: Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Hotel
  • Current owner: Private owner
Doune Castle

Doune Castle

Doune Castle

Doune Castle

Doune Castle is a medieval stronghold near the village of Doune built in the 14th century. It was built for Robert Stewart, the son of King Robert II as his residence. The castle had seen many wars and by 1800, it left in ruins until the State of Stirling claimed the property and restored it in the late 19th century. Today, the building is now maintained by Historic Environment Scotland and is open to the public.

About the Doune Castle

  • Where: Doune, Scotland
  • When: 14th century
  • Who built it: Robert Stewart
  • Style: Gothic style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: Historic Environment Scotland
Drum Castle

Drum Castle

Located in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, the Drum Castle was the seat of the chief of Clan Irvine for centuries. It was originally constructed in the 13th century designed by architect Richard Cementarius and remained in the possession of the Clan Irvine until 1975. Currently, it is open to the public during summer managed by the National Trust for Scotland.

About the Drum Castle

  • Where: Aberdeenshire, Scotland
  • When: 13th century
  • Who built it: Architect Richard Cementarius
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Open to the public during summer
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Drumlanrig Castle

Drumlanrig Castle

Drumlanrig Castle

Drumlanrig Castle

Situated on the Queensberry Estate in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, Drumlanrig Castle is still the home of the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry. It was constructed between 1679 and 1689 and is a very good example of late 17th-century Renaissance architecture. It was commissioned by the first Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas.

About the Drumlanrig Castle

  • Where: Thornhill, Scotland
  • When: 1679-1689
  • Who built it: First Duke of Queensberry, William Douglas
  • Style: Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Home of the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry
  • Current owner: Richard Scott, 10th Duke of Buccleuch
Duart Castle

Duart Castle

Duart Castle was believed to be built in the 13th century by Clan MacDougall, however, it was passed onto the hands of Clan MacLean in the following century. The Clan Maclean would, later on, reside in the Duart Castle since then and became one of the last surviving privately owned Clan Castles in Scotland.

About the Duart Castle

  • Where: Isle of Mull, Scotland
  • When: 13th century
  • Who built it: Clan MacDougall
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? The seat of Clan MacLean
  • Current owner: Clan MacLean
Duff Stately Home

Duff House

Located in Banff, Duff House is a Georgian estate house designed by Scottish architect William Adam for William Duff of Braco in the 18th century. It is a Category A listed building and is part of the National Galleries of Scotland.

About the Duff House

  • Where: Banff, Scotland
  • When: 18th century
  • Who built it: William Duff of Braco
  • Style: Baroque architecture
  • What is it now? National Galleries of Scotland
  • Current owner: Historic Scotland
Dunnotar castle

Dunnotar castle

Dunnotar castle

Dunnotar castle

A ruined medieval fortress located upon a rocky headland on the northeastern coast of Scotland, Dunnottar Castle was built in the 15th century and has played a prominent role in the history of Scotland through to the 18th-century. Because of its strategic location and defensive strength, Dunnottar was chosen as the place where the Honours of Scotland, the Scottish crown jewels, will be hidden from Oliver Cromwell’s invading army in the 17th century. The castle was partially destroyed after the last Earl forfeited his titles by taking part in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715 but was restored in the 20th century and is now open to the public.

About the Dunnottar Castle

  • Where: Stonehaven, Scotland
  • When: 15th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction / Open to the public
  • Current owner: Charles Anthony Pearson
Dunrobin Castle

Dunrobin Castle

Dunrobin Castle

Dunrobin Castle

Dunrobin Castle is the family seat of the Earl of Sutherland and the Clan Sutherland. It has been called home to the Earls and Dukes of Sutherland since the 13th and also served as the family’s stronghold. Currently, the Sutherland family still resides in the castle, however, some parts of the house and grounds have been open to the public.

About the Dunrobin Castle

  • Where: Golspie, Scotland
  • When: 13th century
  • Who built it: Clan Sutherland
  • Style: Scottish baronial architecture / French Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Sutherland family residence / Some parts open to the public
  • Current owner: Elizabeth Sutherland, 24th Countess of Sutherland
Dunvegan Castle

Dunvegan Castle

Dunvegan Castle

Dunvegan Castle

Dunvegan Castle

Dunvegan Castle

Located in Dunvegan on the Isle of Skye, Dunvegan Castle has been the ancestral home of the Chiefs of Clan MacLeod for 800 years already. The castle was originally built in the 13th century and was modified and developed over the centuries. The castle is a Category A listed building and is currently owned by Hugh Magnus MacLeod of MacLeod, the current Chief of Clan MacLeod.

About the Dunvegan Castle

  • Where: Dunvegan, Scotland
  • When: 13th century
  • Who built it: Clan MacLeod
  • Style: Medieval architecture / Victorian Architecture
  • What is it now? The ancestral house of the Chiefs of Clan MacLeod
  • Current owner: Hugh Magnus MacLeod of MacLeod
Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

A historic fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, Edinburgh Castle is Scotland’s number one paid-for tourist attraction and was recently voted top UK Heritage Attraction in the British Travel Awards. The oldest part of the castle, St Margaret’s Chapel was built in the 12th century while the Great Hall was erected by James IV around 1510. The castle was one of the most important strongholds in the Kingdom of Scotland, having involved in many historical conflicts from the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century to the Jacobite rising of 1745. Research shows that it was sieged 26 times in its 1100-year-old history, giving it the title of “the most besieged place in Great Britain and one of the most attacked in the world”.

About the Edinburgh Castle

  • Where: Edinburgh, Scotland
  • When: 12th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction
  • Current owner: Scottish Government
Eilean Donan Castle

Eilean Donan Castle

Eilean Donan Castle

Eilean Donan Castle

Eilean Donan Castle is one of the most recognized castles in Scotland and was built in the 13th century as a defensive fort. It protected the Eilean Dona lands during the Viking age. Over the centuries, the castle was developed and expanded by its owners, however, it was abandoned and fell to total neglect in the 18th century until the whole Eilean Donan island was purchased by Lt Colonel John Macrae-Gilstrap in 1911. The Lt Colonel dedicated the next 20 years of his life to the reconstruction of Eilean Donan and was completed in 1932.

About the Eilean Donan Castle

  • Where: Eilean Donan, Scotland
  • When: 13th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction / Open to visitors
  • Current owner: The Conchra Charitable Trust
Fawside castle

Fawside castle

The Fa’side Castle was originally built in the late 12th century by Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester. When the De Quincy family declared their loyalty to Edward I of England, the Fa’side Castle along with the lands surrounding it was given to the Seton family, who sold the castle to the Fawsides in 1371. The family would, later on, rule the castle, modified and extended it until it was sold in 1631 to an Edinburgh merchant. The castle fell into ruins in the following years, however, it was rebuilt in the mid 20th century and was bought by a private owner and turned it into a private hotel.

About the Fa’side Castle

  • Where: East Lothian, Scotland
  • When: 12th century
  • Who built it: Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester
  • Style: Gothic style
  • What is it now? Hotel
  • Current owner: Private owner
Floors Castle

Floors Castle

Floors Castle

Floors Castle

Located in Roxburghshire, Floors Castle is the seat of the Duke of Roxburghe. It was designed by architect William Adam at the behest of Duke John in 1720. In the 19th century, Duke James commissioned architect William Playfair to make modifications and expansion to the castle.

About the Floors Castle

  • Where: Roxburghshire, Scotland
  • When: 1720
  • Who built it: Duke John
  • Style: Victorian architecture
  • What is it now? Open from April to September
  • Current owner: Dukes of Roxburghe
Fyvie Castle

Fyvie Castle

Fyvie Castle

Fyvie Castle

Fyvie Castle

Fyvie Castle

Located in the village of Fyvie, the Fyvie Castle was believed to be built by William the Lion in 1211. After the Battle of Otterburn in 1390, the castle fell into the possession of five successive families – Preston, Meldrum, Seton, Gordon, and Leith. Each family made modifications to the building. Later in 1982, the last owner from the Leith family sold the castle to The National Trust for Scotland, which still owns the castle up to this date.

About the Fyvie Castle

  • Where: Roxburghshire, Scotland
  • When: 1211
  • Who built it: William the Lion
  • Style: Scottish Baronial architecture
  • What is it now? Open from April to September
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Situated beside the village of Glamis in Angus, Scotland, the Glamis Castle is the home of the Earl and Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne and has been the home of the Lyon family since the 14th century. Believed to have been built by Sir John Lyon, Thane of Glamis, this castle was the childhood home of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, wife of King George VI. Although a very beautiful property, this castle has a grim legend haunting it. The Monster of Glamis, a hideously deformed child born to the family is said to be spotted inside the castle. According to some accounts came from singer and composer Virginia Gabriel who stayed at the castle in 1870, the monster was kept in the castle all his life and his suite of rooms bricked up after his death. Another version of the legend is that a vampire child is born to every generation of the family and will be locked inside the room for all his life.

About the Glamis Castle

  • Where: Glamis, Scotland
  • When: 14th century
  • Who built it: Sir John Lyon, Thane of Glamis
  • Style: Gothic style
  • What is it now? Home of the Earl and Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne /Open to the public
  • Current owner: Simon Bowes-Lyon, 19th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne
Governor House

Governor House

Governor’s House was built by Archibald Elliot in 1815-1817. The current building was the remains of the Calton Jail that was once the largest prison in Scotland. Currently, the house is where the Scottish Fiscal Commission is based and it houses the Scottish Government’s multimedia team.

About the Governor’s House

  • Where: Edinburgh, Scotland
  • When: 1815-1817
  • Who built it: Archibald Elliot
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Scottish Fiscal Commission / House of the Scottish Government’s multimedia team
  • Current owner: Scottish Government
House of Dun

House of Dun

The House of Dun was originally built in the 14th century and was replaced in 1743 following the design of architect William Adam. It was owned by many different owners until it was given to the National Trust for Scotland in 1980. Soon after, the house was opened to the public.

About the House of Dun

  • Where: Dun, Scotland
  • When: 1743
  • Who built it: Architect William Adam
  • Style: Baroque architecture
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Huntly Castle

Huntly Castle

Located in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Huntly Castle is a ruined castle that was once the ancestral home of the chief of Clan Gordon, Earl of Huntly. Originally named Strathbogie, the castle was first built in the 12th century and was reconstructed several times before falling into ruins. It remained under the ownership of the Clan Gordon until 1923 and was then maintained by Historic Environment Scotland. The castle is also a scheduled monument.

About the Huntly Castle

  • Where: Aberdeenshire, Scotland
  • When: 12th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Tourist attraction / Scheduled monument
  • Current owner: Historic Environment Scotland
Inveraray castle

Inveraray castle

Inveraray castle

Inveraray Castle

A country house near Inveraray in the county of Argyll, Inveraray Castle is one of the earliest examples of Gothic Revival architecture and has been the seat of the Dukes of Argyll, chiefs of Clan Campbell, since the 18th century. It was built in the Gothic Revival style and was opened to visitors.

About the Inveraray Castle

  • Where: Inveraray, Scotland
  • When: 18th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? The seat of the Dukes of Argyll, chiefs of Clan Campbell / Open to visitors
  • Current owner: Dukes of Argyll
Inverness Castle

Inverness Castle

Inverness Castle

Inverness Castle

Situated on a cliff overlooking River Ness in Inverness, Scotland, Inverness Castle is said to have been built by Malcolm III of Scotland in the 11th century. It was then reconstructed on the exact same spot where the original Inverness Castle was situated. The castle is not open to the public and currently houses the Inverness Sheriff Court.

About the Inverness Castle

  • Where: Inverness, Scotland
  • When: Reconstructed in the 18th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Medieval architecture
  • What is it now? Houses the Inverness Sheriff Court
  • Current owner: City of Inverness
Lauriston Castle

Lauriston Castle

Lauriston Castle

Lauriston Castle

Lauriston Castle is a 16th-century castle built by Sir Archibald Napier of Merchiston. It was sold and changed owners a few times until the City of Edinburgh took over after the death of Margaret Reid, wife of the owner William Robert Reid. In 2013, it was suggested that the castle should be the official residence for the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, however, the proposal did not go well, instead, the castle was opened to the public.

About the Lauriston Castle

  • Where: Edinburgh, Scotland
  • When: 16th century
  • Who built it: Sir Archibald Napier of Merchiston
  • Style: Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: City of Edinburgh
Lews Castle

Lews Castle

Located west of the town of Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland, Lews Castle was built in 1844–1851 as a country house for Sir James Matheson. He commissioned Glasgow architect Charles Wilson to lead the architectural plan. During the Second World War, the Castle was taken over by the Royal Navy’s Fleet to accommodate the 700 Naval Air Squadron. After the war, it was used for accommodation for students of Lews Castle College in the 1950s until Comhairle nan Eilean Siar took over. The castle is open to the public since 2016.

About the Lews Castle

  • Where: Stornoway, Scotland
  • When: 1844-1851
  • Who built it: Sir James Matheson
  • Style: Victorian style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: Comhairle nan Eilean Siar
Menzies Castle

Menzies Castle

Castle Menzies was the seat of the chiefs of Clan Menzies for over 500 years. It was built in the 16th century by the Clan Menzies and was extended in the 18th century. In the 20th century, it was restored by the Menzies Clan Society and was opened to the public.

About the Menzies Castle

  • Where: Weem, Scotland
  • When: 16th century
  • Who built it: Clan Menzies
  • Style: Renaissance style
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: Clan Menzies
Pollok house

Pollok House

Pollok House is the ancestral home of the Stirling Maxwell family that was built in 1752. It is believed that William Adam was the architecture who made the design. Located in Pollok Country Park, Glasgow, Scotland, the Pollok House is a popular tourist attraction in the City of Glasgow and is open to the public.

About the Pollok House

  • Where: Glasgow, Scotland
  • When: 1752
  • Who built it: William Adam
  • Style: Baroque architecture
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: National Trust for Scotland
Scone Palace

Scone Palace

Scone Palace is a Category A listed historic house and 5-star tourism attraction located in the village of Scone, City of Perth, Scotland. Designed by William Atkinson, the palace is considered as one of the finest examples of late Georgian Gothic style in the United Kingdom. The palace was originally built in the 12th century but was reconstructed in 1802 at the behest of David William Murray, 3rd Earl of Mansfield. Currently, the Palace grounds are also open to the public.

About the Scone Palace

  • Where: Scone, Scotland
  • When: 12th century / Reconstructed in 1802-1812
  • Who built it: David William Murray, 3rd Earl of Mansfield
  • Style: Georgian Gothic style
  • What is it now? 5-star tourism attraction
  • Current owner: Village of Scone
Skaill House

Skaill House

A historic manor house in Sandwick parish on Mainland, the largest of the Orkney Islands, Skaill House was constructed by Bishop George Graham in 1620. As his son became the next laird of the estate, the manor house was passed onto several generations of Lairds of Skaill. Today, the house is open to the public owned by Major Malcolm Macrae, 12th Laird of Breckness.

About the Skaill House

  • Where: Sandwick, Scotland
  • When: 1620
  • Who built it: Bishop George Graham
  • Style:
  • What is it now? Open to the public
  • Current owner: Major Malcolm Macrae, 12th Laird of Breckness
Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle

Located in the City of Stirling, Stirling Castle is one of the largest and most important castles in Scotland, both historically and architecturally. It was believed to be built in the 12th century or even earlier. It hosted countless of Scottish royalties already and endured at least eight sieges as well. Currently, Stirling Castle is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and a very popular tourist attraction in the city managed by Historic Environment Scotland.

About the Stirling Castle

  • Where: Stirling, Scotland
  • When: 12th century
  • Who built it: Unknown
  • Style: Scottish Baronial style / Renaissance style / Gothic Revival style
  • What is it now? Scheduled Ancient Monument / Tourist attraction
  • Current owner: Historic Environment Scotland

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