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My 30 Favorite Types of White Flowers for Your Gardens (A to Z)

Different types of White flowers.

Here are my 30 favorite white flowers for a garden. When it comes to planning and designing a garden, it's important to establish balance with respect to heights, fullness and color.  White is a terrific flower color to add some neutrality to an otherwise bright or even dull (i.e. all green) garden.  

When it comes to planning and designing a garden, it’s important to establish balance with respect to heights, fullness and color.  White is a terrific flower color to add some neutrality to an otherwise bright or even dull (i.e. all green) garden.

For example, in our yard, we have many flowering trees and bushes which look spectacular.  In the center we have an incredible white cherry blossom tree that is nothing short of spectacular and even though it produces white flowers (thousands of them) it adds a gorgeous vibrance to the yard in the spring.

Below we researched and put together a collection of my favorite 30 white flowers.  Enjoy.

Amaryllis

A close-up view of a single, white amaryllis flower.

Scientific Name: Hippeastrum

Type: Bulb

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low – soil needs to be well-drained

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 6.8

Calla Lily

Calla Lilies in a garden in Taiwan.

Scientific Name: Zantedeschia

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: High – the area should be watered well once planted

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0 – 6.5

Camellia

Fresh-looking, white camellia.

Scientific Name: Camellia japonica

Type: Perennial

Sun: Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate – enough water to keep the soil moist

Hardiness Zones: 6 to 10

Soil: pH 5.0 – 5.5

Candytuft

A garden full of White Candytuft flowers.

Scientific Name: Iberis pruitii

Type: Perennial

Sun: Partial Sun to Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 8

Soil: pH 6.0-7.5

Chrysanthemum

Healthy and fully-bloomed white Chrysanthemum.

Scientific Name: Chrysanthemum morifolium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: around pH 6.5

Daffodil

A field full of fresh, White Daffodils.

Scientific Name: Narcissus

Type: Perennials

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High – need lots of water while growing

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.0

Dahlia

Attractive and fresh white Dahlias.

Scientific Name: Dahlia pinnata

Type: Annuals

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low until flowers established, maintained with Moderate Watering

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.0

Daisy

A field of healthy and nurtured daisies.

Scientific Name: Bellis perennis

Type: Perennial, but is often treated as an annual flower

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0 to 7.0

 

Foxgloves

White foxgloves in the garden.

Scientific Name: Digitalis purpurea

Type: Biennial

Sun: Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate – water once or twice a week

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 10

Soil: pH 4.5 – 8.3

Heliotrope

A bunch of White heliotropes.

Scientific Name: Heliotropium peruvianum

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: High – water regularly and thoroughly

Hardiness Zones: 10 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 8.0

Hellebores

White Hellebores, fully-blossomed in a garden.

Scientific Name: Helleborus

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate – especially during dry periods

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 8

Soil: pH 5.5 – 7.0

Hydrangea

 

White Hydrangea flowers in a garden.

Scientific Name: Hydrangea angustipetala

Type: Shrub

Sun: Partial shade

Water Needs: moderate moisture

Hardiness Zones: 6-10

Soil: pH 5-6

Jasmine

Jasmine flowers with droplets of water.

Scientific Name: Jasminum

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 7 to 10

Soil:  pH 4.9 – 8.3

Lily

Fully-blossomed, white lily.

Scientific Name: Lilium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low – water once a week with supplemental watering during dry days

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 8

Soil: pH 5.5 – 6.5

Lily of the Valley

White and beautiful Lily of the Valley flowers.

Scientific Name: Convallaria majalis

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 2 to 9

Soil: pH 5.0 – 7.0

Magnolia Flower

An outdoor shot of a single, white Magnolia Flower.

Scientific Name: Magnolia grandiflora

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low – water when soil is dry

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Soil: pH 5.0 – 6.0

Moonflower

A single Magnolia Flower in White.

Scientific Name: Datura stramonium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low – plant maintenance does not require large amount of water unlike germination stage

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.5

Peony

Fresh-looking, healthy peony in White.

Scientific Name: Paeonia

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 8

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.0

Periwinkle

Pure white, little Periwinkle flowers.

Scientific Name: Vinca

Type: Perennial

Sun: Partial Shade to Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.5

Petunia

White Petunia in a Garden.

Scientific Name: Petunia atkinsiana

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.0

Ranunculus

Fully-developed and well-maintained raninculus flowers.

Scientific Name: Ranunculus

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low – once a week until fall comes around

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 6.5

Scabiosa

White Scabiosa with some cream accents.

Scientific Name: Scabiosa

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low – water once a week

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 7

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.5

Trumpet Flower (Angel’s Trumpet)

White, trumpet-shaped flowers.

Scientific Name: Brugmansia

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 10

Soil: pH 5.5 – 7.0

White Anemone

Anemone with white petals and a yellow center.

Scientific Name: Anemone deltoidea

Type: Perennial

Sun: Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate – during active growth

Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Soil: pH 5.6 – 6.0

White Carnation

A beautiful, white carnation with fresh petals.

Scientific Name: Dianthus caryophyllus

Type: Perennials

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate – water once or twice weekly

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: pH 6.7

White Hibiscus

White Hibiscus with a pinkish center.

Scientific Name: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Water Needs: High – needs large amount of water during blooming stage

Hardiness Zones: 5 to 8

Soil: < pH 7.0

White Rose

A bunch of healthy, white roses.

Scientific Name: Rosa

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Soil: pH 5.5 to 7.0

White Tulip

A field full of white tulips.

Scientific Name: Tulipa

Type: Perennial or Annual depending on the climate

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0-7.0

Wisteria

A bunch of white Wisteria hanging on tree.

Scientific Name: Wisteria sinensis

Type:  Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 5 to 8

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.0

Yucca

White Yucca blossoming in the garden.

Scientific Name: Yucca

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low – water once every 10 days

Hardiness Zones: 10 to 11

Soil: pH 5.5 – 7.5

FAQs

What do white flowers mean?

White flowers, which include white roses, carnations, white daisies, and white calla lilies, are most often associated with purity. They suggest a pristine quality that makes them perfect for a bride. They communicate innocence and perfection, with no blemishes or dirtiness to be found.

Something about what flowers also creates a sense of new beginnings. Where once there has been pain, vice, or suffering, a white flower represents rebirth and the promise of a pure and innocent future.

Which Trees Have White Flowers?

There are a number of trees with white flowers, all of which are breathtaking in their own way.

The fringe tree, native to the Eastern United States, produces clusters of white flowers in the middle of spring. In the summer, these flowers are replaced by fruits that have a way of attracting birds. This tree is easy to care for and makes for a wonderful component of any sizable garden.

The giant dogwood tree, native to Far East Asia, is a robust tree that grows just as large as its name suggests. Its clusters of white flowers typically blossom in June. Its size makes it perfect for an expansive lawn.

The Kobus magnolia is smaller than the giant dogwood but still grows up to thirty feet. Its white flowers bloom early in the year before the leaves have even sprouted. It grows slowly, even in comparison with other trees.

Which white flowers do butterflies like?

Some flowers attract butterflies more than others. For a garden to be graced with these ethereal creatures, it is best to plant the flowers that are most apt to draw their attention.

Allium, cousins to the famous onion, have long stems and produce wonderful balls of beautiful white flowers. Their bulbs can be planted in the fall to allow for spring-time blossoming. With or without visits from butterflies, the flowers themselves are stunning.

Buddleia produces long stalks of white flowers and is so renowned for its butterfly-attracting powers that it is often called “butterfly bush.” The flowers give off an incredibly strong smell considering their diminutive size and bring the butterflies the way catnip attracts cats.

Rose of Sharon is a beautiful flower, and its tendency to attract butterflies only adds to its immeasurable charms.

Do any cacti or succulents have white flowers? If so, what are they?

There are indeed cacti and succulents that have white flowers as beautiful as the prettiest rosebush.

The white torch cactus, native to South America, makes for a perfect potted plant. It grows upward in a vertical column, and the pristine white flowers bloom at its apex, making it look like a well-dressed lady with an elegant flowered hat.

The mammillaria cactus, also known as the Arizona snowcap cactus, is, as its name suggests, topped with a bunch of small white flowers that seem like a coating of snow. Native to the Americas, from the southern United States down to Venezuela, it is easy to maintain.

Do hummingbirds like white flowers? Which ones?

Hummingbirds are perhaps the crown jewel of any immaculate garden, gracing the grounds with their presence. Something about their delicacy, color, and flitting nature makes them an incomparable joy to watch. Hummingbirds do indeed like white flowers, and some are special favorites because of the quantity of nectar they contain.

Rose of Sharon is known to attract hummingbirds as well as butterflies. With its billowing white flowers, it is already a gem of a plant even without avarian visitors. But when a hummingbird hovers and applies its beak to the flower’s red-stained interior, there is an otherworldly beauty briefly attained.

The white columbine is also a known hummingbird attractant. Its shape makes it look like a dove, which, for lovers of symbolism, will further the message of innocence and purity inherent in a white flower. The unique shape also makes it difficult for other nectar-drinkers like bees to access the sweetness inside, meaning hummingbirds will have the succulent nectar all to themselves.

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