17 Different Types of Succulents

Discover the different types of succulents that you can grow as an indoor or outdoor plant. Learn to fall in love again with these plants and appreciate their unique and low maintenance features.

A variety of colorful miniature succulents.

Succulents are easy-to-care-for plants that are often mistaken as cacti. In fact, the cacti make up over 1,300 of the succulent species. There are over 60 different succulent families and about 10,000 plant variants that differ in color, texture, and size.

No matter the succulent species, this genera of plants will absolutely blow you away with its complex growing patterns, their resilience to drought and extreme conditions, their easy maintenance, and their unique beauty.

Through this article we are determined to convince the masses that succulents make for a totally awesome houseplant or garden plant. It’s a great choice of plant especially if you live in a region that experiences significant drought seasons, as they don’t need to be watered as much as other plant types do.

So, continue reading to learn about the main features of different succulent species, where they live, how they operate, how to care for them, and then 17 of some of the most stunning types.


Related: Types of Indoor Cactus | How to Make Succulent Terrarium | Sharp Cactus Garden Ideas | Succulent Flowers | Succulent Garden Ideas | Types of Cacti 

What is a Succulent?

A succulent plant is characterized by its unusual plant structures that are commonly fleshy and thick. Rather than having papery leaves like other plant types, succulents will have my cushion-like leaves. These plant features enable them to exist in very harsh habitats.

The word succulent is derived from the Latin word sucus, which translates to “sap”. This term is referring to the sap-filled leaves of the plants that are their main source of nourishment!

Succulents are different from other plant types for several reasons. They can be identified by fleshy, thick, and often engorged plant parts that are filled with this sap, and this is the main feature that enables them to survive in arid and very dry climates.

While most other plant species photosynthesize through their leaves, many succulent species experience the most photosynthesis from their engorged stems, as they have the most surface area, whereas other plant types have most surface area on their leaves.

There are tons of plant families that have several succulent species within their genus, with some of them being cactaceae, crassulaceae, and aizoaceae. Succulents are incredibly resistant to drought, and they can survive in many habitats that are uninhabitable by other plants.

What are some Succulence Characteristics?

A close look at a blooming hen and chicks succulent.

Succulents are very easily identifiable plants. Though they are often mistaken to be part of the cacti genus, they are different from cacti in many ways. Here are some easy identifying features of succulents:

  • Columnar or spherical growth habits that are often fractal in nature
  • Fleshy leaf shapes that are cushion-like and spherical in shape
  • Reduction of stomata
  • Rib-like features that enable rapid growth in overall plant volume
  • Roots occur near the surface of the soil (enabling them to take up water quickly)
  • Spines, hairs, or a layer of wax on the outer surface of the plant (creates a microhabitat around the plant)
  • Stems are main site of photosynthesis

Where do Succulents Grow?

Succulents are capable of growing in every single continent on the plant (except for Antartica). They can most commonly be found growing in areas like deserts, semi-deserts, steppes, and significantly dry areas. That being said, the world’s most dry landscapes are not suitable for succulents.

Though they can’t survive on no water at all, they can exist in some extremely harsh conditions where other plants couldn’t possibly survive. Some species can survive nearly 2 years without a drop of rain. Many of them can receive enough moisture just through dew and fog.

Succulent species can even exist along sea coasts and at the bottom of dry lakes. Though this doesn’t sound that special, these types of sites have extremely high levels of dissolved minerals which can kill other plant types.

How do you Care for Succulents? 

Sedum morganianum 'Burrito' hanging succulent example

Soil Type

Succulents can survive in many different soil types, though the main feature of them all should be that they are very well drained. They will not survive in heavy soils like clay.

The best type of soil to plant a succulent in is cactus specific soil, regular potting mix that is mixed with either sand, pumice, or perlite. The soil must be well drained, or else the delicate roots of the plant will die very quickly.

When growing succulents indoors, it is essential that their potting mix isn’t too packed down. Help them out by placing a handful of pebbles at the bottom of their pots to ensure proper drainage, or create a drainage hole in the centre of the pot.

Sun Exposure

Succulents are sun loving creatures. This means that they should be receiving a bare minimum of 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. They can survive partial shade, though this may result in an unhappy plant.

If you have a succulents as indoor plants, make sure that they are placed in a south facing window that is not covered by a curtain. This should be enough direct sunlight to keep your precious succulent happy.

Water Level

As we’ve discussed already, succulent are known for being an exceptionally drought resistant plant. This means that they would actually prefer to not be watered than to be over watered. Many plant owners will accidentally kill a succulent plant because they water it when it really doesn’t need to be.

Oftentimes, simple humidity in the air will be enough to keep your succulent happy. You never want the soil for you succulent to ever feel moist. This may be a tricky thing to gauge, so listen up!

You’ll know when a succulent needs to be watered not from observing the soil, but by observing the flesh of the plant itself. If the flesh is engorged and tight, it doesn’t need to be watered. Once you see a little bit of wrinkling or deflation of the plant flesh, that’s when you know to water it.

Make sure to do your proper research before watering you succulent type. Some can handle being directly watered, by there are others that prefer to be misted. So read up on how your succulent species prefers to be cared for.

Temperature

Succulents can be rather specific about their preferred temperature. They tend to be happiest if they are able to exist in temperatures ranging from 60 degrees Fahrenheit to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, though there are certain species that can survive as low as 40, and as high as 90.

One of the quickest ways to damage a succulent is by exposing it to one of these extreme temperatures too quickly — ie by bringing the plant outdoors from indoors or bringing it indoors from the outdoors. It will tell you that it’s been shocked by quickly wilting to a yellow or brown color.

17 Types of Succulents

1. Echeveria

Echeveria

Common Name: Hen & Chicks

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native Growing Range: South America & Central America

Care Level: Low

Echeveria is very common and popular succulents and for good reason. You can easily find these succulents in a number of different colors and sizes, but they will all have the gorgeous spiral of rosettes that are so characteristic. Some Echeveria has soft and hairy leaves, while others are perfectly smooth.

While some of these succulents will not bloom, others may have orange, yellow, or pink flowers. and one of the reasons why they are so popular with homeowners is because they do not die after they flower. People tend to love Echeveria because they are so easy to reproduce from leaf cuttings.

Though they are native to South and Central America, they make for great houseplants in other regions.  If you do have Echeveria in your home, you will want to make sure that you provide them with the best living and growing conditions. These plants need a lot of light and soil that has great drainage or they will not do well. Make sure that they have plenty of air circulation as well.

2. Aeonium

Aeonium

Common Name: Tree Houseleeks

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native: Growing Range: Canary Island, Madeira, Morocco, East Africa

Care Level: Medium

While many people get aeonium and echeveria succulents confused, there are a few differences. While they look very similar in that they both produce their leaves in concentric circles around the center – which makes them look a little like a rose – aeonium has rosettes that are formed on long woody stems.

This main growing feature means that instead of growing closer to the ground the way that echeveria and other succulents do, aeonium can grow much taller! Some varieties can actually reach up to four feet tall and will have rosettes that are the size of a dinner plate!

If you want to keep your Aeonium inside all the time, make sure that you choose a smaller option, which is still just as beautiful. These hardy plants can generally live through a light frost and will go semi-dormant during very hot summers, so you need to make sure that you keep an eye on your plant during these times. Regular watering during dormant periods isn’t advised.

Something unique about aeonium from  other succulent types is that they actually prefer to have moist soil, whereas others prefer soil that is completely dry. They still prefer to exist in full sunlight conditions. They make amazing window plants, ground cover plants, and garden show stoppers.

3. Adromischus Cristatus

Adromischus cristatus in a pot

Common Name: Key Lime Pie, Crinkle Leaf Plant

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native: Growing Range: South Africa

Care Level: Low

This small succulent has a few rosettes that are formed by triangular leaves that are quite fat. They feel a little bit like felt and are very wavy or crested on the tips of the leaves, which makes them fairly easy for most people to identify. Another way to tell apart this type of succulent is the short stem, which is wrapped in thick aerial roots that are reddish and appear to be wiry and hairlike.

This is a very easy succulent to grow, which makes it a great choice for anyone who is just learning how to grow these plants. Since they prefer well-drained soil, you will want to re-pot your adromischus cristatus every other year to ensure not only that the soil isn’t too compact, but also that they have space for their roots to spread out in the pot. They tend to sunburn easily when exposed to midday sun, so try to keep them in a shaded area outside.

The crinkle leaf plant is mostly planted as an indoor houseplant. They should be kept in large south facing windows. Because of their aerial roots, these plants are also the perfect candidate to grow as an air plant inside terrariums!

4. Aloe Vera

Aloe vera

Common Name: Aloe Vera

Botanical Family: Aloe

Native Growing Range: Arabian Peninsula

Care Level: Low

This is an evergreen perennial that not only grows wild around the world but has also been cultivated for medicinal and agricultural uses. This attractive plant grows very well inside your home and has uses for homeowners. The thick, fat leaves contain a juice that has long been used to relieve the pain that you feel from a burn in the kitchen or a sunburn and is safe for topical use.

You will want to make sure that your Aloe Vera is able to dry out completely in between waterings so that its roots do not rot. It’s a good idea to use a porous pot so that the water will be able to leave the soil and it will dry out completely. Make sure that your Aloe Vera has proper drainage, as this plant will start to wilt and rot very quickly if left in too much water. It can be difficult to save your plant when this begins to occur.

A super easy way to know when your aloe vera plant needs water is by observing the fleshy plant leaves rather than the soil. The leaves should be quite thick and full feeling. The moment that the leaves start to appear as being a little bit wilted or deflated, that’s when you know that it should be watered!

5. Bromeliad

Red bromeliad

Common Name: Bromeliad

Botanical Family: Bromeliaceae

Native Growing Range: Tropical Americas

Care Level: Low

Bromeliads are larger succulents that stand out from others due to their size as well as their appearance. While they may look incredibly high maintenance, they are rather easy to take care of at home, and many a gardener love the bright colors of the flower as well as the size and shape of the wide leaves. While they originally grow to cling to surfaces such as trees, these epiphytic plants (just like orchids!) can live in your home as long as you provide them with the proper care.

They do best in shallow pots and low soil mixtures that allow the soil to drain quickly without leaving standing water that will rot the roots. During the growing season, you will need to feed the potted succulent with a half-strength fertilizer to promote healthy growth, and it’s important to make sure that you keep the plant in a humid area. If the plant flowers, it will die shortly afterward, but you can cut an offset, or pup, from the base of the plant to continue growing a bromeliad.

6. Crassula Ovata

Jade plant in a pot.

Common Name: Jade

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native Growing Range: South Africa

Care Level:  Medium

Jade plants are a very popular type of succulent that are often found both in homes and on porches due to the ease with which it is grown, how quickly you can propagate it, and how easily you can trim it to make sure that it doesn’t get too large for your home or space.

What makes these plants different from other types of succulents is that they have very thick stems and fat green leaves that will easily root when placed in water. To ensure that your jade plant is as healthy as possible, you need to make sure that you only water it when the soil is dry to the touch and that it has full sun exposure for a minimum of 6 hours a day.

Like most kinds of succulents, jade plants will not thrive when they do not have enough sun. You will be able to tell that your jade plant isn’t getting the light that it needs to be as healthy as possible when it stretches out and there are large spaces between the leaves. This is known as etiolation and will make your plant look gangly and unsupported.

Though the foliage of this evergreen plant is ornamental enough on its own, jade plants also sprout stunning little white or pink flowers that grow in inflorescences. Growing succulents bring all sorts of beauty to your property!

7. Graptopetalum

Pink flower of a graptopetalum succulent.

Common Name: Leather Petal, Ghost Plant

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native Growing Range: Mexico, Arizona

Care Level: Medium

While graptopetalum may look very similar to echeveria, this succulent type is different because the rosette shapes are formed as stems rather than hugging the ground. The thick leaves do a great job of holding moisture so that the plant can survive periods of drought, and the leaves are fleshy and attractive.

Look for a graptopetalum, or ghost plant, that has foliage that is silvery gray or bluish green. It’s normal for the leaves to have a little bit of pink along the edges when the plant is younger. The leather petal plant would make a great addition to any succulent garden.

Graptopetalum that are grown in full sun are generally yellowish-pink in color, while ones that are grown in partial shade are more bluish-gray. If your graptopetalum lives in full, hot sun all the time, you can expect it to be gray with pink. The plant will sometimes bloom in the spring or summer months and will produce small yellow blooms. The mounding growth of this plant makes it an excellent ground cover variety.

8. Euphorbia

Euphorbia succulent in a pot.

Common Name: Spurge

Botanical Family: Euphorbiaceae

Native Growing Range: South Africa

Care Level: Low

Like other succulents, Euphorbia is a great option if you want a plant in your home but aren’t prepared to spend a lot of time worrying about when to water it and what type of care it will need. There are many varieties of these succulents to choose from, which makes it easy to find one that will look great in your space, but you do need to be careful when handling your new succulent, as they all have a latex sap that is milky in appearance and can be mildly irritating or poisonous.

The euphorbia genus is absolutely enormous and contains over 2,000 individual species. The most well known euphorbia species is the poinsettia, which usually comes out in popularity around Christmas time because of its red and green foliage.

The genus is very widely ranging in terms of growth type as well. Euphorbia species can exist as a tiny annual plant to a large, very long lived tree, and everything else in between!

Euphorbia generally do very well when allowed to grow in full sun and when provided with well-drained soil, as this will ensure that the roots do not rot. Many of these plants will do just fine when faced with drought conditions and will continue to look amazing.

Taking care of your Euphorbia is relatively easy, as you only need to make sure that there aren’t any pests present and that you water them underneath their leaves to prevent mildew.

9. Haworthia

Haworthia

Common Name: Zebra Cactus

Botanical Family: Asphodelaceae

Native Growing Range: South Africa

Care Level: Low

If you want a particularly outstanding looking succulent then you need to consider adding a haworthia to the mix, as they are characterized by unique growth, bold colors and markings, and a wild form that sets them apart from other succulents.

Most Haworthia grows in the form of a rosette and has chubby foliage that may look, at first glances, like an aloe vera. Because haworthia produces multiple pups as it grows, it is fairly easy to separate these from the main plant and produce new plants with ease.

If there is a problem with your haworthia, you will want to check the roots, as they will give you a clue as to the overall health of your plant. If the roots are not a pale yellow and look like they have been rotting, you may need to trim them back to improve the health of your plant. Haworthia are some of the most tolerant succulents, making them ideal for people who tend to overwater their plants or forget to water them at all.

Haworthia plants are amazingly unique looking. They are one of the easiest to plant succulents. They can be kept as an indoor succulent plant, in a container garden, or as an outdoor plant!

10. Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe

Common Name: Flaming Katy

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae 

Native Growing Range: Madagascar, Tropical Africa

Care Level: Medium

One of the reasons why these succulents are so popular is because they have such gorgeous blooms that are available in a wide variety of colors, making them incredibly popular with florists. It’s easy to encourage your kalanchoe to bloom even in the middle of the winter by providing them with ample light, but you do need to be careful that you don’t overwater them during this time, as you can easily damage them and cause them to rot, just like with any other type of succulent.

The leaves of the kalanchoe vary widely in shape, from ones that are paddle-shaped to others that look more like the ears of an elephant. While most kalanchoe is upright plants that mimic the appearance of other houseplants, others are hanging varieties and can be used in hanging baskets around the home. Make sure to keep an eye out for common household pests and to cut off the flowering head when it is bloomed out so that the plant can focus its energy on being as healthy as possible.

Depending on the flaming katy plant that you choose, it can grow as either an annual (experiences its entire life cycle in 1 year),  as a biennial (experiences its entire life cycle in 2 years), or as a perennial (continues to blossom year after year). If you happen to see one in a garden center, snatch it up right away!

11. Huernia

Huernia

Common Name: Life Saver Plant, Little Owl Eyes

Botanical Family: Apocynaceae

Native Growing Range: Eastern & Southern Africa

Care Level: Medium

While there are many succulents that bloom and have very attractive flowers, if you want to make sure you are choosing a succulent that is sure to impress you with the beauty of their blooms, you will want to consider huernia. Not only do they appear as though they exist under the sea, but their spring blossoms will shock you!

These plants prefer very bright light so that they can maintain their sage green color, although incredibly harsh sun will cause them to shrivel and change color. If you expose your huernia to too much sun it can actually die (uh oh), but not enough light will lead to fewer flowers being produced during the growing season. Maintaining the proper amount of sun exposure is one of the more difficult grow conditions of the plant.

Like most succulents, if you overwater your huernia you will accidentally rot the roots. Make sure that you plant them in shallow pots and be careful to water them occasionally, but deeply. Huernia is also fairly easy to propagate if you want to have more plants, as all you have to do is pop off a piece of the plant at one of the segmented areas and place it on top of the soil so that it can grow roots.

12. Sedum

Sedum

Common Name: Stonecrops

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native Growing Range: Africa, South America, Central America, East Asia

Care Level: Medium

Typical of other succulents, sedum species store water in their leaves. Their leaves grow in clusters around very thick stems or stalks. While some leaves are shiny and almost look like they are covered in wax, others are hairy. There are many differences in the size and appearance of these succulents, as they can be very tall and look great as houseplants, while others make excellent ground cover plants for the garden.

These succulents do best in full sunlight in order to thrive and grow. When these plants are grown under the right conditions, they will bloom, producing very pretty flowers that are red, orange, lavender, yellow, or white and shaped like small stars. There are more than 400 different plants in this genus, making it relatively easy to find a Sedum that will meet your needs.

Certain species of sedum also have edible components! Specifically sedum reflexum and sedum divergens, have leaves that are edible. They are said to have a bit of an astringent taste and can be used as though they were a salad green. Make sure to always properly identify and research an unknown plant before tasting, as not all sedum species are considered edible!

13. Agave

Agave

Common Name: Agave

Botanical Family: Asparagaceae

Native Growing Range: North America, Central America, South America

Care Level:

Agave plants are incredibly large succulents that have spiny tips on the ends of the leaves. The leaves grow in a rosette, although it can be difficult to distinguish that shape and pattern at first glance. Smaller agaves tend to be around the size of a plate, where there are some succulents that will actually grow to be 20 feet in diameter. While most have sharp points on the leaves, there are very few plants that have softer leaves, although these can be tricky to find.

The sign of maturity of this succulent is a very tall stalk that grows out of the center of the plant for the flowers. The flowers vary in color and are shaped like bells. Once the plant produces seed pods it will generally die, although there are a few species that won’t. Providing the plant with ample sun and protection from frost will ensure that it lasts as long as possible and is healthy. It can take years and years for an agave plant to be mature enough to flower.

Not only with an agave plant provide beauty to your outdoor landscape, but it has some culinary appeal as well. The agave stalks can be roasted and eaten, and they have a similar sweet flavor profile to sugarcane. The agave flower blossoms are also edible, and not everybody knows that both mezcal and tequila are made from agave plants as well!

14. Dudleya

Dudleya

Common Name: Liveforever, Chalk Lettuce, Chalk Liveforever

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native Growing Range: North America

Care Level: Medium

While originally included in the genus echeveria, dudleya varies enough that they are now recognized as a different type of succulent. They do look very similar to echeveria, as they form rosettes and have similar colors, but their flowers are very difficult. Dudleya flowers arise from the bottom of the plant rather than the middle and the flower stems are covered in leaves that are spread out along it.

When properly cared for, dudleya can live for up to 100 years – hence their strange common name, “liveforever”. They have a dormant period in the summer and spend most of their time in the winter growing. They can easily rot when left in the damp soil or when water is left on the leaves, so it is very important to take care when planting and maintaining these succulents. Low light will cause these succulents to etiolate quickly, so most people prefer to grow them outside where they will have ample light.

Dudleya species are among the few succulent species that prosper in North America. When growing wild, they can be found along cliff faces, rocky hillsides, and other dry sites in California, Utah and Arizona. These can easily be clipped in the wild and brought home as they are experts at asexual reproduction.

15. Cotyledon

Cotyledon in a pot

Common Name: Pig’s Ear, Rounded-Leaf Navel-Wort

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native Growing Range: Southern Africa

Care Level: Low

Most of all Cotyledons are poisonous, so owners need to take special care when growing these plants and maintaining them in their homes. They require much of the same care and conditions of other succulents, including dry soil, plenty of sun, and warm temperatures.

One of the main reasons why people love to grow these succulents is because of their interesting shape and appearance. Unlike other succulents that tend to be much smaller, these plants can grow to be quite large, which can be stunning both in the yard and in the home.

When you are going to buy a Cotyledon succulent, you will want to make sure that you consider the type of flower that you want, where you will keep it, and how you are going to prevent children or animals from being in danger of the poison. Under the right conditions, you can enjoy a succulent with thick leaves, long stems, and gorgeous yellow, pink, or orange flowers.

Whereas many other succulent flowers tend to be 5 petalled and star shaped, certain cotyledon species have very striking and elegant flowers that are tubular in shape. They are borne in inflorescences and create a rather charming display of flowers.

16. Sempervivum

Sempervivum

Common Name: Houseleeks, Liveforever, Hen & Chicks

Botanical Family: Crassulaceae

Native Growing Range: Africa, Asia

Care Level: Low

Sempervivum is some of the most common succulents that you can buy. They are often known as “hens and chicks” plants and, while they look very similar to echeveria, they are incredibly cold hardy and spread quickly during the growing season, forming mats and covering areas without any problems.

Gardeners who want to include succulents in their outside gardens but are worried about how they can do so without the plant dying will benefit from investing in sempervivum, as they can survive snow as well as being eaten to the ground.

Generally, Sempervivum will form rosettes that vary from half an inch to more than 6 inches wide, and while their leaves vary in appearance, they all store water. They have a typical growth pattern that consists of a larger rosette and smaller offsets surrounding it. The mother plant remains attached to the baby plants via a stolon and is able to pass nutrients through the stolen until the smaller plant is able to form its own roots and take care of itself.

17. Senecio

Senecio

Common Name: Ragworts, Groundsels

Botanical Family: Asteraceae

Native Growing Range: Northern Hemisphere

Care Level: Medium

Unlike other types of succulents, it can be very difficult to find a commonality in the Senecio genus. These succulents can vary from very small, upright plants, to long, trailing ones that look great in hanging baskets. The one way to tell that these plants are all a member of the Senecio genus is due to their appearance and the way that the flowers bloom.

The blooms of Senecio succulents are often overlooked by most people due to their small size. If you want to grow these succulents, it’s important to note that they are toxic and can cause major health problems when consumed. This makes them a great addition to your garden, as they are very resistant to deer and other pests.

One might not have guessed that the daisy and aster family (asteraceae) would be host to a succulent species, though almost every genus of plants has a succulent within it. They are wonderfully popular as a container garden plant, though they’re also the perfect choice for hanging pots and greenhouses as well.

Distinguishing Types of Succulents

Monocarpic

Sempervivum is an example of a monocarpic succulent.

Many gardeners have experienced a succulent plant randomly dying on them with no clear indication as to why. This is because they’ve been caring for a plant that is monocarpic! This is the equivalent as an annual plant, wherein it experiences its entire life cycle within one year, and will die shortly after it blossoms.

Though this may seem like a lot of work, monocarpic succulents can be awesome because it gives you an opportunity to practice your propagation! Simply collect your succulent pups and start some new plants. A sempervivum succulent is a prime example of an attractive monocarpic succulent.

Polycarpic

Sedum is an example of a polycarpic succulent.

Sedum is an example of a polycarpic succulent. This means that the succulent can bloom multiple times before dying. If you want to experience a lot of flowers without having to worry about the main succulent dying, you will want to look for polycarpic plants.

A polycarpic succulent is the equivalent of a perennial plant. As long as it properly cared for and can exist in its ideal growing conditions, the polycarpic plant will continue to provide beautiful blossoms years after year.

Further Considerations..

Size

Large silver succulent cactus with sharp tips in foreground and the blossoming stalk of a century plant shooting skyward in the background.

While most succulents are rather small and will work well in your house or garden, if you want to really have a showstopper plant, you will want to consider buying one that is larger. In that case, think about planting an Agave, if they will grow in your area.

Hardiness

Sempervivum succulents are known for their hardiness that they can thrive in very cool temperature.

Most succulents need very warm, dry air to survive the best that they can. If you live in a cold area and don’t want to worry about bringing your succulents in during the fall and winter, you need to be very careful when choosing what plant to buy. Some succulents, such as Sempervivum, can handle the chill of a zone 3 winter.

FAQs

Are succulents edible?

There are thousands of different succulent species out there. Some of them are edible, and some of them certainly are not. It is very important to a huge amount of research and proper plant identification before attempting to try eating a plant that you have never eaten before.

Some commonly known edible succulent plants include agave, aloe vera, and sedum. Certain species of sedum also have edible components! Specifically sedum reflexum and sedum divergens, have leaves that are edible. They are said to have a bit of an astringent taste and can be used as though they were a salad green. Make sure to always properly identify and research an unknown plant before tasting, as not all sedum species are considered edible!

Can succulents be kept as indoor plants?

Nearly any succulent species can be kept as an indoor plant as long as one can properly mimic the growing conditions of its natural growing range. This will commonly include maintaining temperatures between 6o degrees Fahrenheit and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, properly researching the appropriate amount of moisture the plant requires, and ensuring that your succulent receives an adequate amount of sunlight within a day as well.

Can succulents be propagated in water?

Succulent species are plant type that can almost always be successfully propagated in water. This can be done through stem and leaf cuttings that are kept in a clear glass of water with distilled water inside. Roots will eventually start to develop from the cuttings that you can clearly see through the clear glass!

Can succulents survive winter? 

Depending on the mean temperature of the winter in your growing region, your succulent may be able to survive the winter. It is not a good idea to treat a succulent as a perennial that you bring inside, as the shallow roots of succulents are very delicate and can be easily damaged if you attempt to repot it.

Succulents can be rather specific about their preferred temperature. They tend to be happiest if they are able to exist in temperatures ranging from 60 degrees Fahrenheit to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, though there are certain species that can survive as low as 40, and as high as 90.

One of the quickest ways to damage a succulent is by exposing it to one of these extreme temperatures too quickly — ie by bringing the plant outdoors from indoors or bringing it indoors from the outdoors. It will tell you that it’s been shocked by quickly wilting to a yellow or brown color.

Can succulents grow in sand?

Many succulent species that are found growing in the wild can be found growing in sand. This is because sand is wonderfully well drained – which if the most important growing condition for outdoor succulents – and because it remains dry for a long time. It’s actually a good idea to mix your own potting mix with sand to create the perfect environment for your cultivated succulent.

How do succulents survive in the desert? 

A succulent plant is characterized by its unusual plant structures that are commonly fleshy and thick. Rather than having papery leaves like other plant types, succulents will have my cushion-like leaves. These plant features enable them to exist in very harsh habitats.

The word succulent is derived from the Latin word sucus, which translates to “sap”. This term is referring to the sap-filled leaves of the plants that are their main source of nourishment!

Succulents are different from other plant types for several reasons. They can be identified by fleshy, thick, and often engorged plant parts that are filled with this sap, and this is the main feature that enables them to survive in arid and very dry climates.

While most other plant species photosynthesize through their leaves, many succulent species experience the most photosynthesis from their engorged stems, as they have the most surface area, whereas other plant types have most surface area on their leaves.

Should I mist succulents?

Misting a succulent is one of the best ways to ensure that you don’t over water your plant. Many succulent species remain completely happy just by absorbing the humidity, dew, and fog in the wild. Too much rain and a succulent can perish.

Should succulents be in direct sunlight?

Succulents are sun loving creatures. This means that they should be receiving a bare minimum of 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. They can survive partial shade, though this may result in an unhappy plant.

If you have a succulents as indoor plants, make sure that they are placed in a south facing window that is not covered by a curtain. This should be enough direct sunlight to keep your precious succulent happy.

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