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30 Different Types of Orange Flowers (A-Z)

Different types of orange flowers.

Orange is my favorite color. I love it in clothing, home decor and flowers. It's also the de facto Dutch national color. Here are my favorite 30 orange flowers. Each listed flower includes a photo and key growing information.

Orange is my favorite color. I love it in clothing, home decor and flowers. It’s also the de facto Dutch national color.  Perhaps it’s my favorite color because I love Autumn so much when orange reigns supreme glowing in changing leaves and of course pumpkins.

Lucky for me, there are many flowers that bloom in orange.  Here are my favorite 30 orange flowers. Each listed flower includes a photo and key growing information.

Related: Orange Bedroom Ideas | Orange Dining Room Ideas | Orange Interior Design Ideas | Orange Kitchen Ideas

Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera plant bearing orange flowers.

Scientific Name: Aloe barbadensis

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 7.0 – 8.5

Begonia

A field full of bright orange Begonias.

Scientific Name: Begonia obliqua

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full sunlight to partial shade, depending on the variety

Water Needs: High – water regularly and keep the soil moist

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 10

Soil: pH 5.5 – 6.2

Bird of Paradise

Bird of Paradise with a powerful orange accent.

Scientific Name: Strelitzia

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Soil: pH  6.0 – 6.5

Bulbine

Bulbine in a light orange shade.

Scientific Name: Bulbine frutescens

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High – water regularly but don’t overwater

Hardiness Zones:  9 to 11

Soil: pH  6.1 – 7.8

Butterflyweed

A garden with orange Butterflyweeds.

Scientific Name: Asclepias tuberosa

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.0

California Poppy

A bunch of Orange California Poppies.

Scientific Name: Eschscholzia californica

Type: Perennial but often grown as Annual

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 5 to 12

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.5

Canna

A clear shot of an orange Canna.

Scientific Name: Canna

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High – develop well with a good supply of water

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: around pH 6.5

Carnation

A unique, orange carnation.

Scientific Name: Dianthus caryophyllus

Type: Perennials

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate – water once or twice weekly

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: pH 6.7

Chrysanthemum

Fully-blossomed Chrysanthemums with a bright orange color.

Scientific Name: Chrysanthemum morifolium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: around pH 6.5

Coppertips

Orange Coppertips in a garden.

Scientific Name: Crocosmia

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate watering until established

Hardiness Zones: 6 to 9

Cosmos

A bed of orange cosmos.

Scientific Name: Cosmos

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.0

Crown Imperial

Crown Imperial with orange accents.

Scientific Name: Fritillaria imperialis

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low – needed during dry season

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 10

Soil: pH 5.0 – 8.5

Dahlia

A fully-bloomed, orange Dahlia.

Scientific Name: Dahlia pinnata

Type: Annuals

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low until flowers established, maintained with Moderate Watering

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.0

Daylily

Well-developed, orange Daylily.

Scientific Name: Hemerocallis

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs:  High –  watering is most important during Spring and Summer

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0 to 6.5

Gerbera Daisy

Bright orange Gerbera Daisies.

Scientific Name: Gerbera Jamesonii

Type: Annual or Perennial, depending on climate

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.0

Helenium

A garden with orange Heleniums.

Scientific Name: Helenium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 8

Soil: pH 5.5 – 7.0

Iris

Light-orange irises in a garden.

Scientific Name: Iris croatica

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate – water thoroughly when planting

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 6.8 – 7.0

Lantana

Orange flowers of Lantana.

Scientific Name: Lantana camara

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 2 to 11

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.5

Lily

Fully-bloomed Lilies in a bright orange color.

Scientific Name: Lilium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: 5.5 – 6.5

Lily of the Incas

Lily of the Incas in bright Orange.

Scientific Name: Alstroemeria

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate – enough moisture until established

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 10

Soil: < pH 7.0

Lion’s Tail

Unique and detailed Lion's Tails.

Scientific Name: Leonotis leonurus

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.6 – 7.5

Marigold

A field full of bright orange marigolds.

Scientific Name: Tagetes

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sunlight to Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low – once per week but more during warmer months

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.5

Mexican Sunflower

A well-established and healthy Mexican Sunflower.

Scientific Name: Tithonia diversifolia

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: Hardy to zone 9a

Soil: pH 6.6 – 7.5

Ranunculus

A field of Orange Ranunculus.

Scientific Name: Ranunculus

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low – once a week until fall comes around

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH  6.0 – 6.5

Rose

Unique orange roses in a garden.

Scientific Name: Rosa

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Soil: pH 5.5 to 7.0

Strawflower

A fully-bloomed, orange strawflower.

Scientific Name: Xerochrysum bracteatum

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate – water during dry season

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.6 – 7.5

Tiger Lily

Tiger Lilies with unique details.

Scientific Name: Lilium lancifolium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: pH 4.5 – 7.8

Trumpet Honeysuckle

Trumpet Honeysuckle flowers in striking orange.

Scientific Name: Lonicera sempervirens

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: High – consistent watering until established

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Soil: pH 3.7 – 6.8

Tulip

Orange tulips in a field.

Scientific Name: Tulipa

Type: Perennial or Annual depending on the climate

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0-7.0

Zinnia

An orange Zinnia in full bloom.Scientific Name: Zinnia elegans

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs:  Low

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 5.5 – 7.5

FAQs

What do orange flowers mean?

Orange is a bright and fun color. We associate it with diversion, explosiveness, verve, and vivacity. As such, orange flowers are meant to represent enthusiasm and excitement. Are orange flowers the ideal for a funeral or a wedding? Of course not. But for an event or message that is meant to get the blood flowing and show life being lived at full throttle, then orange is the perfect color.

Orange flowers sent to a lover bring along a message of fun and zaniness. If the intention is to make a person smile and laugh at the bright quirkiness of life, orange flowers make for a perfect adornment.

Which trees have orange flowers?

Orange flowers are far from common on trees. With that being said, there are some trees that bloom orange flowers, and they are all beautiful.

The royal poinciana is a deciduous, orange-flowering tree that can grow quite large- up to fifty feet, in fact. It is also known as the “flamboyant tree,” which says a lot about its debonair appearance. It doesn’t do well in the cold, but thrives in drought-prone areas.

The scarlet wisteria, also known as the rattlebox, is a small deciduous tree that grows quickly and blooms brilliant orange flowers in the spring and the summer.

The Fragrant Orange Tea Olive is a hardy evergreen that can grow up to twenty-five feet in height. Its orange flowers bloom in the fall and winter, and while it is a southern tree, it can survive cold temperatures surprisingly well.

The African Tulip Tree, native to the northern portion of its eponymous continent, can grow upwards of forty feet in height. Its clusters of orange and yellow flowers typically bloom in the spring.

Which orange flowers do butterflies like?

Flowers favored by butterflies can make a garden more beautiful while helping these gorgeous endangered creatures. Some orange flowers are especially attractive to butterflies.

The Mexican sunflower is a dark orange color and stands out brilliantly in any garden. It attracts butterflies as well as other helpful pollinators.

The aptly named butterfly weed is a type of native milkweed. It grows naturally in North America, and getting some growing in a garden is sure to bring the butterflies following quickly behind them.

The buddleja, also known as the tangerine butterfly bush, produces a fragrant aroma that attracts butterflies and keeps a garden smelling fresh.

Do any cacti or succulents have orange flowers? If so, what are they?

There are many types of cacti with orange flowers, among them orange snowball, desert gem, parodia, and the crown cactus. Moon cacti are also often orange, although they can be found in a variety of colors.

The lobivia jajoiana, native to the north of Argentina, is a prickly green cactus that blooms massive, gorgeous orange flowers. Nights in the deserts of the Salta and Jujuy provinces where this cactus originates can be quite cold, and as a result, this species is remarkably hardy. It can survive in cold temperatures, making in an excellent option for a potted house plant.

The flowering kalanchoe is perhaps the most famous succulent with orange flowers. It grows to be six inches to a foot, and blooms bunches of orange, yellow, or red flowers. It is native to the tropical portions of Africa and can survive with very little water and minimal care, making it a favorite in succulent gardens.

Do hummingbirds like orange flowers? Which ones?

Hummingbirds do indeed like orange flowers, especially those with a powerful aroma or an abundance of nectar.

The buddleja, with its delightful smell, draws hummingbirds as well as butterflies. Its beautiful appearance, coupled with its pollinator-attracting power, makes it an ideal mainstay in a garden.

The trumpet vine or trumpet creeper is sometimes known as the hummingbird vine, and for very good reason. Its brilliant orange flowers are long and tubular, making them the perfect receptacles of nectar for hungry hummingbirds. It grows quickly, and gardeners should be aware of its conquering tendencies. While a garden full of trumpet vine might attract an impressive number of hummingbirds, it is not likely to encourage variety in the plants that are able to truly thrive.

The trumpet honeysuckle, also a vine, is especially attractive to the gorgeous ruby-throated hummingbird. It is similar to the aforementioned trumped vine in appearance. but grows less quickly and is less aggressive in nature, making it a better choice for many gardeners.

Related: Orange Bathroom Ideas | Orange Living Room Ideas

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