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Discover How Much a New Roof Costs (by Sq. Ft. and Roofing Material)

Close-up photo of a mansion's tile roof.

Unless you've got cash to burn, nobody likes having to invest in a new roof, but an investment it is. Your house can quickly deteriorate if you don't replace your roof when it's necessary. The good news is there are popular inexpensive options. We list out approximate cost ranges for each type of roofing material by square footage.

Do you need to replace your roof?

Every house incurs this cost at some point.  A leaky roof will only cost you more in the long run.  It’s best to deal with it when needed.

Yes, a new roof is expensive regardless of which type of roof shingle you get.

The good news is that you have options and some options are far less expensive than others.  While nobody likes to unexpectedly part with $5,000 to $15,000 or more, at least the investment will last a reasonable amount of time.

Let’s dive in.

What dictates the cost of a roof?

There are several factors that dictate the cost of the a new replacement roof.  They include:

  1. Your region:  The cost of labor varies tremendously depending on where you live.  Typically, labor costs more on the coasts.
  2. Square footage (size of your roof):  Obviously the footprint in square footage will dictate how much a new roof will cost you.  Our average cost estimates below take this into account.
  3. Quality of materials:  As with all things home improvement related, there are different qualities in the materials you choose.  The better the quality, typically the higher the cost.
  4. The intricacy of your roof:  If you have an intricate roof with many angles, grades, etc. it will cost more because it’s more complicated.  You can see all the different roof styles/designs here.

Accordingly, when providing cost estimates for a roof replacement, the ranges are considerable given the several factors involved.

Below we set out the average cost for roof replacements by square footage.

1. Asphalt Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $1,500 to $5,500
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $3,000 to $11,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $4,500 to $16,500
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $6,000 to $22,000

Life Span: 15 to 30 years

Pros:

  • Asphalt shingles blend in and compliment most home exteriors.
  • The shingles come in a wide variety of colors and styles.
  • Asphalt is easy and quick to install and take down.

Cons:

  • Roofs in warmer climates will need to be replaced more frequently due to high heat.
  • Asphalt is not environmentally friendly. It is estimated that 20 billion pounds are in US landfills.

References:

2. Metal Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $5,000 to $14,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $10,000 to $28,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $15,000 to $42,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $20,000 to $56,000

Life Span:  40 to 80 years.

Pros:

  • Metal roofing can increase the resale price of a home.
  • Metal roofs can lower insurance costs, especially in areas that are vulnerable to wildfires.
  • Metal roofing can lower utility bills by up to 40%.

Cons:

  • Homes in areas with saltwater exposure may see faster corrosion of metal.
  • The installation of a metal roof is more expensive and the installation time is longer.
  • The metal can be slippery, creating a dangerous condition when it rains if the roof needs to be accessed.

References:

3. Slate Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $9,000 to $16,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $18,000 to $32,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $27,000 to $48,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $36,000 to $64,000

Life Span: 150 years

Pros:

  • Slate is easily recyclable and eco-friendly. The lifespan of this type of roofing also means it is better for the environment.
  • Slate tiles are easy to maintain, and are not impacted by water damage, temperature fluctuations or bad weather.
  • As slate is dense, it helps regulate the homes’ temperature.

Cons:

  • Slate can be easily broken if walked on. The process to then replace the tile is complicated and finding a perfect match is impossible,
  • Slate is a heavy material and not all homes are structurally able to hold the weight.
  • Installation requires a specialist. A badly installed slate roof can cause major roof problems.

References:

4. Tile Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $10,000 to $18,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $20,000 to $36,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $30,000 to $54,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $40,000 to $72,000

Life Span: 100 years

Pros:

  • Clay tiles can increase the energy efficiency of the home. The tiles have a natural thermal resistance and the individual placement creates a natural thermal barrier.
  • Clay tiles are durable and can withstand extreme weather conditions, like high winds and hail.
  • Clay tiles do not require maintenance and broken tiles can be replaced easily as they are all individual.

Cons:

  • Clay tiles can weigh up to 850 lbs per square foot, because of this additional structural enforcement may be necessary before they can be installed.
  • Clay tiles can be difficult to install, and must be installed in a specific pattern to prevent moisture from getting in.
  • While clay tiles can withstand harsh weather, they can not be stood on and break from any weight placed on them.

References:

5. Wood Shake Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $6,000 to $10,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $12,000 to $20,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $18,000 to $30,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $24,000 to $40,000

Life Span: 15 to 50 years

Pros:

  • Wood shake shingles are durable and can withstand hurricanes, hail and snow storms, and severe storms.
  • The shingles are a natural insulator, and make homes more energy efficient.
    Wood shake shingles are easy and quick to install.

Cons:

  • Wood shake shingles are not environmentally friendly or sustainable.
  • Wood shakes are high maintenance and need to be cleared of leaves and debris.
  • Wood shakes can raise insurance rates, and are not allowed in some areas.

References:

6. Rubber Roofing Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $4,250 to $8,250
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $8,500 to $16,500
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $12,750 to $24,750
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $17,000 to $33,000

Life Span: 15 to 30 years

Pros:

  • Rubber shingles are eco-friendly, as they are made from 95% recycled materials.
  • Rubber shingles are available in a wide variety of colors.
  • As rubber is resistant to UV rays and absorbs heat it can save money on energy bills.

Cons:

  • Rubber roofs need to be cleaned 3-4 times a year for warranty purposes.
  • Rubber roofs should be installed by professionals, with specific knowledge in installing them.
  • Right after installation the roof can give off a strong smell for a while.

References:

7. Copper Roofing Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $11,000 to $15,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $22,000 to $30,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $33,000 to $45,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $44,000 to $60,000

Life Span: 60 years

Pros:

  • A copper roof can reduce insurance rates, especially in areas at risk from wildfires.
  • Copper roofing does not require special treatment, like some metal roofs, as copper does not corrode with weathering.
  • Installing a copper roof provides an average of 85.9% ROI.

Cons:

  • Copper roofs should be installed by experienced professionals, which can be difficult to find.
  • Copper, like all metal roofs can be noisy in harsh weather conditions.

References:

8. Steel Roofing Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $6,000 to $12,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $12,000 to $24,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $18,000 to $36,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $24,000 to $48,000

Life Span: 15 to 30 years

Pros:

  • Steel roofing requires little to no maintenance.
  • Steel roofing is resistant to severe weather, and can prevent excess snow from adding weight to the house structure.
  • The roofing is energy efficient and can save homeowners 40% annually on their energy bills.

Cons:

  • The noise created by a steel roof can be loud, especially in heavy rain.
  • Steel roof panels expand and contract, if not installed correctly this can lead to roof damage and leaks.

References:

9. Foam Roofing Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $2,500 to $3,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $5,000 to $6,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $7,500 to $9,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $10,000 to $12,000

Life Span: 20 to 30 years

Pros:

  • Foam roofing can cut down energy bills by 20%. The material creates extra insulation for the building, and keeps heat out in the summer.
  • Foam roofing is easy to install and is installed over the existing roof.
  • This type of roofing is environmentally friendly and sustainable, as it creates little to no waste.

Cons:

  • Foam roofing can only be applied in certain conditions, the roof surface needs to be clear of ice, snow or other visible moisture.
  • The roof must be inspected at least twice a year and after extreme weather events.
  • A foam roofing expert will be required to carry out repairs and make sure any damage is fixed correctly.

References:

9. Corrugated Metal Roofing Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $3,500 to $6,500
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $7,000 to $13,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $10,500 to $19,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $14,000 to $26,000

Life Span: 15 to 30 years

Pros:

  • A corrugated metal roof will be free from bugs and mold.
  • On average the resale of a home with a corrugated metal roof sees a ROI of 85.9%.
  • A corrugated metal roof can reduce insurance rates, especially in areas at risk from wildfires.

Cons:

  • A corrugated metal roof requires re-coating every 15 years or so with simple polymer.
  • Corrugated metal is not leak proof as the caulking will not last as long as the metal.

References:

10. Tar and Gravel Roofing Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $2,500 to $4,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $5,000 to $8,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $7,500 to $12,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $10,000 to $16,000

Life Span: 30 years

Pros:

  • Tar and gravel roofing is easy and quick to install.
  • This type of roofing is low maintenance and does not require a lot of maintenance over the lifetime of the roof.
  • A tar and gravel roof can be walked on more than regular roofs.

Cons:

  • Tar and gravel roofing is not recommended in areas with a lot of snow or rain, as it is sometimes prone to leak.
  • Strong sun exposure can damage the roof membrane if it is not covered well with gravel.
  • The installation is heavy and can require the roofing joists to be strengthened.

References:

11. Fiberglass Shingles Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $1,000 to $3,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $2,000 to $6,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $3,000 to $9,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $4,000 to $12,000

Life Span: 15 to 20 years

Pros:

  • Fiberglass shingles require less asphalt than traditional shingles, and are easier to transport. This means they are more environmentally friendly.
  • Fiberglass shingles are better in wet and damp as they resist moisture more readily.
  • This type of shingles come in a variety of colors.

Cons:

  • Fiberglass shingles are not as durable at asphalt shingles and are more likely to be damaged by severe weather.
  • Homeowners in higher heat areas may find they need to replace fiberglass shingles sooner than those in colder climates.

References:

12. Solar Shingles Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $21,000 to $25,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $42,000 to $50,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $63,000 to $75,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $84,000 to $100,000

Life Span: 20 to 30 years

Pros:

  • Replacing traditional shingles with solar shingles can provide a ROI of 71.6% on the resale of the home.
  • There is a 30% tax credit available for installing solar shingles.
  • Solar shingles can drastically reduce power bills.

Cons:

  • On cloudy days an alternative power source will be necessary as the shingles will not produce enough energy.
  • Solar shingles require a certain slope of roof and high sunlight to be effective.

References:

13. Composite Plastic Shingles Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $4,000 to $6,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $8,000 to $12,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $12,000 to $16,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $16,000 to $24,000

Life Span: 50 years

Pros:

  • Composite plastic shingles are light and easy to install.
  • The shingles are durable and withstand most weather conditions, and can even be walked on.
  • Composite plastic shingles are virtually maintenance free.

Cons:

  • Plastic shingles are not recommended in cold climates as they are more vulnerable to breaking and cracking in winter.
  • Once installed the shingles are shiny and can be clearly identified as plastic.
  • Plastic shingles come with a variety of fire resistance.

References:

14. Concrete Tile Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $3,000 to $5,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $6,000 to $10,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $9,000 to $15,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $12,000 to $20,000

Life Span: 50 years

Pros:

  • Concrete tiles are resistant to insects and rots.
  • Concrete tiles can withstand hail, severe weather, and even fire.
  • The tiles are environmentally friendly as they are made from earth materials and can be pulverized and recycled once removed.

Cons:

  • Concrete roof tiles are heavy and require a home evaluation by a structural engineer to make sure that the home can hold the weight.
  • The underlay under concrete tiles need to be replaced every 20 years, even though the tiles last for up to 50 years.
  • Regular maintenance is required to stop leaks.

References:

15. Architectural Shingles Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $1,000 to $1,500
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $2,000 to $3,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $3,000 to $4,500
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $4,000 to $6,000

Life Span: 30 to 50 years

Pros:

  • Architectural shingles can give the look of slate, cedar or clay at a much lower cost.
  • The shingles are fire resistant, wind resistant, and prevent mold growth.
  • Architectural shingles provide an average return on investment of 6%.

Cons:

  • Architectural shingles weigh more than traditional shingles and may require extra reinforcement.
  • Roofs in warmer climates will need to be replaced more frequently due to high heat.

References:

16. Tin Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $3,000 to $15,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $6,000 to $30,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $9,000 to $45,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $12,000 to $60,000

Life Span: 40 years

Pros:

  • Tin roofing is eco-friendly as it is made with 30 to 60% of recycled materials.
  • Tin roofs are easy to maintain and repair.
  • Tin roofing is heat and weather resistant, and can stop the home from getting too warm.

Cons:

  • If the roof becomes damaged and a part needs to be replaced it can be difficult to match the new material to the existing roof.
  • Noise can be a concern with metal roofs and homeowners may want to considering extra roof insulation to keep the noise level low.

References:

17. Cedar Shingles Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $2,000 to $3,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $4,000 to $6,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $6,000 to $9,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $8,000 to $12,000

Life Span: 20 to 25 years

Pros:

  • Cedar shingles can withstand high winds.
  • Cedar shingles are low weight and don’t require any extra structural reinforcement.
  • The efficient manufacturing of cedar shingles means they are more environmentally friendly to make.

Cons:

  • Cedar shingles do not do well in very wet climates.
  • Cedar shingle roofs require regular maintenance and must be cleared of debris. If rot sets in it can spread quickly.
  • Cedar shingles can be sprayed with fire resistant chemicals or a treatment to prevent algae growth but not both.

References:

18. Zinc Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $4,500 to $8,000
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $9,000 to $16,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $13,500 to $24,000
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $18,000 to $32,000

Life Span: 35 to 50 years

Pros:

  • Zinc is non-corrosive and therefore will not rust or be affected by adverse weather.
  • Even is scratched zinc will self-heal, the hydroxide carbonate layer replenishes itself.
  • Zinc roofing has an average ROI of between 80 and 90%.

Cons:

  • If not properly installed, zinc roofing can let in moisture and mold can grow. Proper installation is of the utmost importance.
  • The patina rate of zinc can vary depending on the climate.

References:

19. Standing Seam Metal Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $3,500 to $6,800
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $7,000 to $13,600
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $10,500 to $20,400
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $14,000 to $27,200

Life Span: 50 years

Pros:

  • Standing seam metal roofs do not require regular maintenance.
  • Repairs to a standing seam metal roof are simple and less costly than repairs to traditional shingles.
  • Standing seam metal roofs do not rust or fade due to weather.

Cons:

  • Standing seam metal roofs are more complicated to install than traditional roofs.
  • Standing seam metal roofs can not in installed on flat roofs. This type of roof can not be installed on roofs that have a rise of less than 2 feet per 12 inches.
  • Noise can be a concern with metal roofs and homeowners may want to consider extra roof insulation to keep the noise level low.

References:

20. TPO – PVC Roofing Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $1,850 to $5,720
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $3,700 to $11,440
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $5,550 to $17,160
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $7,400 to $22,880

Life Span: An estimated 10-20 years, but the product is still too new.

Pros:

  • TPO – PVC roofing are durable and resistant to bacteria, algae and debris build up.
  • This type of roofing is environmentally friendly and can help reduce energy waste from HVAC systems.
  • The lightweightness of TPO – PVC roofing makes it easy and quick to install.

Cons:

  • TPO – PVC roofing is still new to the market and manufacturers are still working on the formula, this can mean that not all products are created equal.
  • Contraction and expansion of this type of roof can lead to seams lifting and can cause leaks.

References:

Aluminum Roof Average Cost

  • 1,000 sq. ft.: $3,750 to $5,500
  • 2,000 sq. ft.: $7,500 to $11,000
  • 3,000 sq. ft.: $11,250 to $16,500
  • 4,000 sq. ft.: $15,000 to $22,000

Life Span: 50 years

Pros:

  • Aluminum is recyclable and therefore an environmentally friendly option for roofs.
  • An aluminum roof can help stop the rest of the house from burning in the event of a fire.
  • An aluminum roof can keep the house cool in the summer and retain heat in the winter, lowering energy bills.

Cons:

  • Over time aluminum loses its shine and needs to be painted.
  • Aluminum is bent under pressure, extreme weather, such as hail, can damage the roof more easily than traditional roof options.
  • Extra insulation may be necessary to dampen the noise of hail or heavy rain.

References:

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