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50 Different Fruit Tree Flowers

A variety of fruit tree flowers.

Do you love flowering fruit trees, but have the hardest time identifying them? This guide gives you a complete list and picture of 50 beautiful flowering fruit trees. Check it out and soon you will be able to name all of your favorites.

Do you love looking at fruit trees when they bloom? There is nothing as pretty as driving down a road with the trees blooming on either side. There are so many of them that it can be difficult to identify them. In case you are anything like me, here is an article listing the 50 Fruit Tree Flowers.

Table of Contents

Apple Blossoms (Malus domestica)

A close look at apple blossoms.

The flowers of an Apple Blossom are abundant on a tree for which has been well cared. The tree requires full sunlight. They need to be watered moderately so that the soil stays moist but not soaked. The soil must be well draining. In general apple trees have a hardiness zone of 3 through 8, but it depends on the variety.

Armenian Plum (Prunus armeniaca)

A close look at Armenian Plum Blossoms.

The fruit of this tree is better known as an apricot. They have a hardiness zone of 3 through 10. They need anywhere from 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight. They prefer a pH level of 5.5 to 6.5. They like soil that is sandy and well drained. For the first two seasons, you want to soak the tree with water. After that, they need deep watering every 10 days.

Asian Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia)

A close look at a blossoming Asian Pear.

Asian Pears are different than other pear trees. They have a hardiness zone of 5 through 9. They do not require much water. They should only be watered when the first two to three inches are dry. Asian Pear trees will survive in soil with a pH of 5.0 to 7.5, they prefer it to be 6.0 to 6.5. They need 6 to 8 hours of sunlight.

Avocado (Persea americana)

A close look at blossoming avocado leaves.

The Avocado prefers to be in the sun and only needs light watering. The soil must remain moist but not soaked. They have a hardiness zone of 10 through 12. They need to be watered 2 to 3 times per week but the soil must dry our before watering.

Cactus (Cactaceae)

A cactus blossoming with pink flowers.

Cacti does well in acidic soil with a pH of 5 to 6.5. The hardiness zone depending on the individual type of cactus. The zone ranges all over. A cactus does actually need water. It needs water about once a week, but it should completely dry out between watering. Cacti does well in the sun but it can become scorched by the sun.

Carambola (Averrhoa carambola)

A close look at blossoming Carambola flowers.

The Carambola tree is also known as star fruit and likes acidic soil with a pH of 5.5 to 6.5. They like to be watered but they do not do well with being over watered. They like full sunlight, but will grow in partial shade. It has a hardiness zone of 10 through 12.

Cashew (Anacardium occidentale)

A close look at a cashew tree.

The ideal hardiness zone for a Cashew Tree is 10 and 11, but it can handle the temperatures in zone 9. They prefer to have sandy soil that drains well with a pH of 4.5 to 6.5. Once the Cashew Tree is established, it is tolerant of drought conditions but should still be watered on a weekly basis.

Climbing Fig (Ficus pumila)

A close look at a climbing fig tree.

The Climbing Fig tree likes a lot of bright sunshine. It also needs a fair amount of water, so it should be watered frequently. It has a hardiness zone of 9 through 11. It is not picky about its soil and does well in all soil types.

Coconut (Cocos nucifera)

A close look at a coconut tree with fruits.

The Coconut tree needs full sunlight and well draining soil to thrive. They prefer soil with a pH of 5 to 8. A Coconut tree needs to be watered with about an inch of water every week. Coconut trees have a hardiness zone of 10. They prefer warmer climates. They do not handle weather that goes below 32 degrees.

Common Medlar (Mespilus germanica)

A close look at a blossoming Common Medlar.

The Common Medlar tree has a hardiness zone of 4 through 9. They prefer to be in direct and full sunlight. They want their soil to be well drained with a pH of 6.5 to 7.5. The Common Medlar wants a fertile soil that does not have a high pH. They need adequate amounts of water, but not so much that they are soggy.

Crabapple Tree (Malus sylvestris)

Three blossoming Crabapple Trees.

Crabapple Trees can tolerate drought conditions but they prefer to have regular water. They want soil that remains moist but provides good drainage. They need a soil pH of 6.0 to 7.0. They have a hardiness zone of 4 through 8.

Dragon Fruit Tree (Hylocereus undatus)

A close look at the flower of a Dragon Fruit Tree.

The Dragon Fruit tree only needs water when the soil is dry to the touch. It must be moist but not soaked. The ideal soil pH is 5, but it can survive in pH 4 to 6. It has a hardiness zone of 10a through 11.

English Walnut (Juglans regia)

A close look at the blossoming English Walnut.

These beautiful trees have a hardiness zone of 4 through 9. The English Walnut tree enjoys full sun and some partial shade. It also prefer soil that is fertile and well draining. The soil should be kept moist but not soaked. The English Walnut tree can tolerate just about any soil type, but it does prefer a pH of 6.8 to 7.2.

European Pear (Pyrus communis)

A close look at the flowers of a European Pear.

Pears are delicious to eat and the trees produces beautiful flowers. They like to be well watered, about once or twice a week, and maintain moist soil. They prefer to be in full or partial sunlight. These trees can grow up to 40 feet tall. While European Pear trees will survive in soil with a pH of 5.0 to 7.5, they prefer it to be 6.0 to 6.5.

Fig Tree (Ficus carica)

A close look at a blossoming Fig Tree.

The fruit of a fig tree is delicious and prefers warmer climates. It has a hardiness zone of 8 and higher, but it can be grown in colder climates, such as 6 and 7. The tree must be kept in full sunlight in the summer. It needs a potting mix with a soil base for best drainage. The tree should be watered moderately so that the soil remains moist.

Grapefruit Tree (Citrus × paradisi)

A blossoming Grapefruit Tree.

The Grapefruit tree likes to be in full sunlight. They have a hardiness zone of 9 through 11. New Grapefruit trees need water one or twice per week, but established trees only need water every other week. The hotter the weather, the more water it needs. It does not like soggy or wet soil.

Guava Tree (Psidium guajava)

A close look at the blossom of a guava tree.

The Guava Tree is not an overly fussy tree. The only thing it needs is warm weather. It does not handle frost well. They do want to have full sunlight. While they can survive in drought like conditions, they do prefer to have full watering on a regular basis. They prefer rich soil with organic material. They prefer a soil pH of 5 to 7. They have a hardiness zone of 9 through 12.

Jackfruit Tree (Artocarpus heterophyllus)

A close look at a blossoming jackfruit tree.

A jackfruit tree that is new cannot handle drought conditions. They prefer deep and rich soil that is a bit porous and can hold water. They want a constant source of moisture but do not want their roots to be wet and soggy. The hardiness zone for the jackfruit is 11 and above. The need a lot of sunlight, humidity, and warmth.

Japanese Flowering Cherry (Prunus x yedoensis)

A close look at a Japanese Flowering Cherry.

This cherry tree needs full sunlight with partial shade. It requires soil with a pH of 6.7 to 7.1. It needs to have soil that drains well. It has a hardiness zone of 5 through 8. It needs to have regular water to retain moisture.

Japanese Persimmon (Diospyros kaki)

A close look at a blossoming Japanese Persimmon.

The Japanese Persimmon tree has a hardiness zone of 8 through 11. They enjoy full sunlight and loamy soil that is well draining. The best soil pH for the Japanese Persimmon is 6.0 to 7.5. While the Japanese Persimmon can survive through periods of drought, as long as they are not too long. They do prefer water on a regular basis.

Keylime (Citrus × aurantiifolia)

Like most citrus trees, the Keylime tree likes to be in full sunlight. They have a hardiness zone of 9 through 11. New Keylime trees need water one or twice per week, but established trees only need water every other week. The hotter the weather, the more water it needs. It does not like soggy or wet soil.

Kumquat (Citrus japonica)

Kumquat is a citrus fruit and likes to be in full sunlight. They have a hardiness zone of 9 through 11. An established Kumquat tree only needs water every other week. The hotter the weather, the more water it needs. It does not like soggy or wet soil.

Lemon Tree (Citrus × limon)

The blossoming flowers of a Lemon Tree.

Lemon trees are rugged and durable as long as they are cared for properly. They have a hardiness zone of 8b through 11. They need full sunlight and great drainage. They can survive in just about any soil. A soil pH of 5.5 to 6.5 is perfect for lemon trees. Newly planted lemon trees need moist but not soggy soil.

Kaffir Lime Tree (Citrus hystrix)

The Kaffir Lime tree is similar to the Keylime tree and it likes to be in full sunlight. They have a hardiness zone of 9 through 11. New Kaffir Lime trees need water one or twice per week, but established trees only need water every other week. The hotter the weather, the more water it needs. It does not like soggy or wet soil.

Loquat Tree (Eriobotrya japonica)

A cluster of Loquat Tree blossoms.

The Loquat Tree prefers sunlight, but likes partially shady area. They have a hardiness zone of 8 through 10. Once they are established, they only need small amount of water, about once a week. They do not like soggy soil. They have no preference when it comes to the pH of their soil.

Lychee Tree (Litchi chinensis)

Clusters of Lychee tree blossoms.

These trees love water and need to be watered regularly. They do not want soggy soil. They like to be in full sunlight and can flourish in just about any soil as long as it drains well. They prefer a pH range of 5.0 to 7.5, so that it is more acidic. They have a hardiness zone oof 10a through 11.

Mandarin Orange (Citrus reticulata)

A cluster of fresh Mandarin oranges with a blossom on the side.

The Mandarin Orange is fairly easy to take care of on a regular basis. The tree requires regular watering, which is once or twice, for best growth. A Mandarin Orange can tolerate drought conditions. The Mandarin Orange tree prefers a soil pH level of 6.0 to 7.0. They have a hardiness zone of 8b through 11.

Mango Tree (Mangifera indica)

A close look at a blossoming mango tree.

Mango trees are like many other fruit trees in that they like their soil to be moist as they are new and as they get older, they require less water. They require full sunlight and rich soil that drains well. The prefer a soil pH of 5.5 to 7.5. They have a hardiness zone of 9b to 11.

Nectarine (Prunus persica)

A close look at the flowers of a Nectarine tree.

Nectarine Trees have a hardiness zone of 6 through 8. Nectarine trees need water but they do not want to soak in it. Make sure they have enough water to be moist but not soggy. Nectarine trees prefer soil that is a bit more acidic, so they want a pH level around 6.0 to 6.5. They want their soil to drain well.

Orange Tree (Citrus sinensis)

A close look at the flowers of an Orange Tree.

This citrus fruit tree likes to be in full sunlight and can grow 20 to 30 feet tall. They have a hardiness zone of 9 through 11. New trees need water one or twice per week, but established trees only need water every other week. The hotter the weather, the more water it needs. It does not like soggy or wet soil.

Papaya (Carica papaya)

A close look at a papaya tree with lots of fruits.

This is a fast growing tree and can yield fruit quickly. The papaya tree requires full sunlight. They have a hardiness zone of 10 through 11. The papaya tree requires constantly watering to produce fruit. They prefer soil that will retain moisture.

Peach Tree (Prunus persica)

A close look at a blooming peach tree.

A Peach tree needs exposure to full sunlight. It requires acidic soil with a pH of 6.0 to 6.5. It has a hardiness zone of 4 through 9. The soil should be kept moist but not soggy.

Pear Blossom Trees (Pyrus)

A close look at the flowers of a Pear Blossom Tree.

Pear blossoms are a delicate flower that has little flavor and produces a scent that is sweet and mild. Once pollinated, they can become actual pears. They prefer soil that has a lower pH around 5.5 to 6.5. They have a hardiness zone of 5 through 9. Like many spring flowers, pear blossoms need good drainage.

Pecan (Carya illinoinensis)

A close look at a blooming pecan tree.

Pecan trees need a fair amount of water. They should be watered weekly and it should be a slow and deep watering. Pecan trees like soil that is slightly acidic to neutral and ranges from 6.5 to 7.0 pH. They also prefer a soil that drains well. They have a hardiness zone of 7 through 9. Pecan trees prefer as much sunlight as they can get.

Peppermint Peach Tree (Prunus persica Peppermint)

A close look at the flower of a Peppermint Peach Tree.

A Peach tree needs exposure to full sunlight. It requires acidic soil with a pH of 6.0 to 6.5. It has a hardiness zone of 4 through 9. The soil should be kept moist but not soggy.

Persimmon Tree (Diospyros virginiana)

A close look at a Persimmon Tree.

The Persimmon tree has a hardiness zone of 5 through 11. They enjoy full sunlight and loamy soil that is well draining. The best soil pH for the Japanese Persimmon is 6.0 to 6.5. They prefer water on a regular basis.

Plum Tree (Prunus)

A close look at a Plum Tree with lots of fruits.

Plum Trees need full sun and well drained soil that is sandy. They prefer soil with that has a pH range of 5.5 to 6.5. They have a hardiness zone of 3 through 9.

Pomegranate Tree (Punica granatum)

The vibrant flowers of a pomegranate tree.

The hardiness zone for the pomegranate tree is 7 through 12. They are resilient and can adapt to any soil, but they prefer a soil that is loamy and allows for good drainage. They have low requirements for water and can live in a drought like environment for quite some time. It suffers more from too much water rather than not enough.

Pomelo Tree (Citrus maxima)

A close look at the flowers of a pomelo tree.

A Pomelo tree needs to have moist soil and direct sunlight most of the time. While this tree is not particular about the type of soil it has, it does need to have a good drainage system. The soil can be acidic or more alkaline and the tree will thrive. It must be watered at least one time per week.

Prairifire Flowering Crabapple (Malus ‘Prairifire’)

A close look at a blooming Prairifire Flowering Crabapple.

Prairifire Flowering Crabapple Trees can tolerate drought conditions but they prefer to have regular water. They want soil that remains moist but provides good drainage. They need a soil pH of 6.0 to 7.0. They have a hardiness zone of 3 through 8.

Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum)

A bunch of ripe Rambutan.

The Rambutan tree prefers a combination of sand and soil. They want soil that is well draining. The roots of the Rambutan tree do not like to be wet. They like to be in direct sunlight up to 12 hours. The soil should be moist but not soggy. They have a hardiness zone of 10 through 12.

Rose Apple Tree (Syzygium jambos)

A close look at a Rose Apple Tree.

The Rose Apple tree requires a pH of 4.46. The Rose Apple tree can stand to have little water, but going too long without water is bad for it. They have a hardiness zone of 9.

Sapodilla

A close look at a blooming Sapodilla.

The Sapodilla Trees bears tropical fruit and has a hardiness zone of 10. Sapodilla trees are able to withstand drought like conditions but do need some water. They want their soil to drain well. Sapodilla trees do not have a soil preference.

Sour Cherry (Prunus cerasus)

A look at a Sour Cherry tree.

While Cherry Trees are beautiful, and the Sour Cherry tree does yield fruit, it is not a fruit that you want to eat. It prefers sandy and loamy soil but does not like clay soil at all. They need to have a good drainage system. Sour Cherry trees need regular watering in their first year.

Strawberry Tree (Arbutus unedo)

A close look at a blooming Strawberry Tree.

Strawberry trees are tolerant to drought, but need water. They have a hardiness zone of 7 through 10. They need full sun or some shading. They need an acidic or neutral soil.

Sugar Apple (Annona squamosa)

A close look at the blooming sugar apple tree.

Sugar Apple trees require full sunlight for optimal growth. Sugar Apple trees are used to the sandy soil of Florida. As a result the have a low pH requirement, 4 to 7, for their soil. They need enough water to keep the mulch moist. They have a hardiness zone of 8 through 10.

Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium)

A close look at sweet cherry blossoms.

Sweet cherry trees do will in soil with a pH level of 6.0 to 6.5. A cherry tree can handle drought but it will cause less fruit to grow on the trees. Too much water will cause the cherry tree to rot. They have a hardiness zone of 5 through 7.

Sweet Chestnut (Castanea sativa)

A close look at ripe sweet chestnut fruits.

The Sweet Chestnut tree has a hardiness zone of 4 through 7. It likes full sunlight, but also requires some cold temperatures. Sweet Chestnut trees only need to be watered about every 10 days. They require the pH level of their soil to be from 4.5 to 6.5. They need their soil to be well draining.

Weeping Pear Tree (Pyrus salicifolia)

A close look at a blooming Weeping Pear Tree.

This tree needs an average amount of water. It has a hardiness zone of 4 through 7. It prefers full sunlight and soil that drains well.

White Mulberry (Morus alba)

A close look at a blooming white mulberry.

The White Mulberry tree has a hardiness zone of 3 through 9. They prefer soil with a pH of 5.0 to 7.0. Not much bothers these trees. They can handle cool temperatures and drought like conditions. They should be watered on a regular basis. They do not need full sunlight and do not mind partial shade.

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