25 Flowers Similar to Clematis - Home Stratosphere

25 Flowers Similar to Clematis

Explore our wonderful list of adorable flowers similar to clematis. These gorgeous blossoms boast splashes of vivid hues that will enrich any homeowner's garden.

Pink clematis with beige centers and bright green leaves growing in the garden.

Clematis is a genus of nearly 300 species belonging to the buttercup, Ranunculaceae botanical family. Clematis plants are primarily perennial climbers, but shrub and tree variants are available. Clematis is native to most parts of North America and hardy to zones 4 to 11.

These vigorous growers can reach heights of 8 to 30 feet, but small herbaceous species generally only grow 2 to 5 feet tall.

Clematis will enrich any homeowner’s garden, whether small or large variety. Clematis has a wide range of vines, shrubs, and trees that produce single or double flowers with contrasting yellow stamens atop their bright green foliage. These gorgeous nodding blooms range in various hues, including pearly white, cherry pink, creamy pink, and purple-blue.

Consider adding various Clematis plants to your garden as some varieties start blooming in early spring, and others only start in late summer through to early fall.

Clematis thrive in full sun to partial shade (at least 6 hours of sun). In addition, ideally, plant Clematis in moist, well-draining, loamy soil. Lastly, Clematis require 1 inch of water weekly to thrive.

Clematis treats joint pain, rheumatism, gout, headaches, varicose veins, bone disorders, skin conditions, and fluid retention.

Let’s looks at 25 flowers similar to Clematis

Table of Contents

Related: Sun-Loving Flowers | Water-Loving Flowers | Shade-Loving Flowers | Types of Flowers | Types of Flowers by Color | Types of Flowers by Alphabet | Types of Flower Colors

1. Sweet Pea

Close-up of sweet peas with purple ruffled blooms.

Lathyrus odoratus is a legume or perennial vine native to Southern Italy and the Aegean Islands. Sweet pea grows in a hardiness zone of 4 to 8 and mature to 6 to 8 feet tall.

Sweet peas are colorful and fragrant flowers famous in old cottage gardens. You mostly see sweet pea trailing along trellises and fences, but they are just as gorgeous spilling over containers. From late winter to early summer, sweet peas display an array of intensely fragranced, gently ruffled blooms in soft white, red, pink, or purple flowers.

Like Clematis, sweet peas need full sun to partial shade, loamy, well-drained soil, and weekly watering to thrive.

Sweet pea is wildly cultivated for its pretty, fragrant flowers.

2. Star Jasmine

Star Jasmine white blossoms with spiral petals and small yellow centers.

Trachelospermum jasminoides is a beautiful flowering vine or shrub native to Asia. Star Jasmine thrives in hardy zones of 8 to 10 and mature to 3 to 6 feet tall and wide.

Star jasmine is a popular evergreen adorned with glossy, deep green, oval-shaped foliage. In late spring, Star jasmine displays an abundance of clusters of sweetly fragrances, white, star-shaped blooms along its wiry, twining stems.

Like Clematis, Star Jasmine thrives in full sun to partial shade, moist loamy, and well-drained soil. In addition, Star Jasmine needs weekly watering to succeed, but if you live in a dry climate, consider watering twice a week.

Star Jasmine treats rheumatoid arthritis, sore throats, and various boils.

3. Mandevilla

Close-up of mandevilla plant with bright pink trumpet-shaped flowers in full bloom.

Mandevilla spp. is a flowering vine native to North America, Central America, and South America. Mandevilla vines grow in a hardy zone of 10 to 11 and mature to 3 to 10 feet tall with 3 to 4 feet spread.

Mandevilla is a woody, twining tropical vine with glossy, bright green leaves and sprays of funnel-shaped, creamy white or pinkish-red blooms from summer to fall.

Like Clematis, Mandevillathrives in full sun to partial shade. However, Mandevilla prefers sandy, moist, and well-draining soil. In addition, Mandevilla requires consistently moist soil, so water your plant as soon as the soil begins to dry out.

Mandevilla is a popular container plant or an ornamental that grows along trellises and walls.

4. Moonflower

Close-up of moonflower white blooms growing in a garden.

Ipomoea alba, commonly known as Moonflower, is a tender perennial vine native to North America, Central America, and South America. The Moonflower is hardy to zones 10 to 12 and matures 10 to 15 feet tall and 3 to 6 feet wide.

The Moonflower is a fascinating vine with long twining, slightly prickly stems, gorgeous heart-shapes, and dark green foliage. From summer to fall, the Moonflower graces us with sweetly-fragranced, pure white flowers that open during the evening and close when kissed by the morning sun – earning its common name.

Moonflowers grow best in full sun (at least 6 hours of direct sunlight) and prefer rich, loamy, and well-draining soil, similar to the Clematis. When young, water your Moonflowers enough to keep the soil consistently moist, but only water established plants once the soil dries out.

The entire Moonflower plant treats snake bites. However, Moonflowers are excellent at hiding unforgiving fences and walls.

5. Black-eyed Susan Vine

Black-eyed Susan vine with bright yellow blossoms contrasted with black centers.

Due to its strikingly similar blooms to the famous Black-eyed Susan, Thunbergia alata is commonly known as the Black-eyed Susan vine. However, the Black-eyes Susan vine is a tender perennial bushy vine that is native to East Africa. Black-eyed Susan vines grow in a hardy zone of 10 to 11 and mature to 3 to 6 feet tall and wide.

Black-eyed Susan vine is a vigorous, twining evergreen vine with lush, heart-shaped green leaves. The Black-eyed Susan vine displays vivid, single, yellow or orange flowers with purple-black throats during summer.

Like Clematis, the Black-eyed Susan vine thrives in full sun to partial shade. However, the Black-eyed Susan vine prefers rich, fertile, medium-moist, and well-draining soil. In addition, the Black-eyed Susan vine requires consistently moist soil, so water your plant as soon as the soil begins to dry out.

Black-eyed Susan vine is a popular container plant or an ornamental vine that grows along trellises and walls.

6. Purple Hyacinth Bean

Purple hyacinth bean with small purple blooms clustered on its long, burgundy stalks.

Lablab purpureus is a vigorous annual vine native to Tropical Africa. The Purple Hyacinth Bean grows in hardy zones of 10 to 11, matures 10 to 15 feet tall, and has 3 to 6 feet spread.

The Purple Hyacinth Bean is a somewhat exotic-looking vine with bright green, pointed leaflets with purple undersides that grow in sets of three leaves. From summer to fall, the Purple Hyacinth Bean flaunts eye-catching sprays of violet blossoms. Glossy, dark purple pods follow the gorgeous booms.

Like Clematis, the Purple Hyacinth Bean thrives in full sun, moist loamy, and well-drained soil. In addition, the Purple Hyacinth Bean prefers consistently moist soil.

The Purple Hyacinth Bean is an excellent source of iron, magnesium, and edible starch.

7. Snapdragon Vine

Snapdragon vine backdrop with bright green leaves and multicolored flowers in purple, blue, and pink hues.

Maurandya scandens is a perennial vine, often grown as an annual. The Snapdragon Vine is native to Mexico with a hardiness zone of 9 to 10 and grows 6 to 9 feet long and 3 to 6 feet wide.

The Snapdragon Vine is a charming and delicate vine that bears bright-green, arrow-shaped foliage. Although not related to the traditional Snapdragon, the flowers of the Snapdragon Vine resemble those of the popular Snapdragon annual. The Snapdragon Vine displays drooping trumpet blooms in hues of white, pink, lavender, and blue from summer to fall.

The Snapdragon Vine thrives in full sun to partial shade with rich, loamy, and well-drained soil like Clematis. The Snapdragon Vine is somewhat drought tolerant but blooms best with regular watering of 1 inch every week.

Use Snapdragon Vines to attract birds and bees or to use as an accent to climb up trees and trellises.

8. Nasturtiums

Close-up of nasturtium plant with yellow and orange blossoms.

Tropaeolum spp. is a popular annual flower native to Central and South America. Nasturtiums are hardy to zones 2 to 11 and grow 1 to 10 feet tall and 1 to 3 feet wide.

Nasturtiums are handsome, fast-growers with an abundance of bright green foliage similar to water lilies. From early summer until frost, Nasturtiums will reward you spots of jewel-toned blooms that poke their heads out between the masses of foliage.

Like Clematis, Nasturtiums thrive in full sun. However, the Black-eyed Susan vine prefers average, medium-moist, and well-draining soil. In addition, Nasturtiums prefer weekly watering schedules but are relatively drought-tolerant.

The leaves and flower petals of the Nasturtium plant contain high levels of vitamin C. Nasturtiums improve the immune system and treat bacterial and fungal infections.

9. Chocolate Vine

Chocolate vine with plum blossoms and bright green elliptical leaflets.

Akebia quinata is a semi-evergreen perennial vine vigorous to a fault. The Chocolate Vine is native to China, Japan, and Korea; however, it has naturalized in many areas of North America. The Chocolate Vine is hardy to zones 4 to 8 (evergreen from zones 6 to 8) and matures to 15 to 40 feet tall.

The Chocolate Vine is a twining, woody vine with bright green elliptic leaflets that turn purplish in cold weather. In spring, the woody vine is adorned with racemes of petite, crimson red flowers with a spicy chocolate scent.

Like Clematis, the Chocolate Vine needs full sun to partial shade and one inch of weekly watering to thrive. In addition, the Chocolate Vine prefers sandy to loam and well-drained soil.

The Chocolate Vine is an excellent anti-inflammatory agent which treats arthritis and joint pain similar to Clematis.

10. Morning Glory

Close-up of morning glory plant with dazzling purple blooms accentuated with ruby centers.

Ipomoea purpurea or Morning Glory are fast-growing annual vines native to Mexico and Central America. The Morning Glory is hardy to zones 2 to 11 and grows 6 to 10 feet tall and 3 to 6 feet wide.

The morning glory is a vigorous twining plant with lush, heart-shaped, evergreen foliage. The Morning Glory is often one of the first flowering vines with brightly colored clusters of trumpet-shaped blooms with a slight fragrance. The flower buds are gently swirled up and unfold when the morning sun hits them, giving them their common name.

Like Clematis, the Morning Glory needs at least 6 hours of full sun and one inch of weekly watering to thrive. In addition, the Morning Glory prefers moist and well-drained soil.

The Morning Glory treats stomach aches and reduces stress.

11. Cup And Saucer Vines

Cup and saucer vines with dainty purple flowers and dark green foliage creeping in the garden.

Cobaea scandens, better known as the cup and saucer vine, is a perennial climber native to the subtropic regions of Mexico. The cup and saucer vine are hardy to zones 9 to 11 and grows 10 to 20 feet long and 3 to 6 feet wide.

Cup and saucer vines feature thin, lightweight, oblong foliage and dainty purple or white flowers that resemble the shape of a cup, hence the unique name. Once the flowers are fully open, the flowers develop a delicious, floral-honey fragrance.

Like Clematis, the cup and saucer vines need at least 6 hours of full sun and moist, well-drained soil to bloom efficiently. Cup and saucer vines prefer consistently moist soil, so water your plant as soon as the soil dries out.

Cup and saucer vine blooms are ornamentals that are a lovely addition to late-season bouquets.

12. Hardy Hibiscus

Hardy hibiscus with pristine white flowers highlighted with deep red centers and white stamens.

Hibiscus moscheutos is a gorgeous herbaceous perennial native to North America. The hardy hibiscus is hardy to zones 5 to 9 and mature 3 to 7 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide.

The hardy hibiscus is wildly known for its abundance of blooms during summer. The hardy hibiscus has maple-like foliage, with gorgeous oversized flowers and oversized, showstopping stamens. In addition, the blooms have tissue-thin, ruffles petals in hues of white, red, pink, and blue.

Hardy hibiscus grows best in full sun and rich, well-draining soil, similar to Clematis. However, the hardy hibiscus is thirstier than the Clematis and needs watering 2-3 times per week.

Hardy hibiscus is an ornamental plant that attracts butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds.

13. Million Bells

Million bells with bunches of purple, rounded flowers growing in a summer garden.

Calibrachoa, also known as million bells, is an annual or herbaceous perennial hybrid native to South America. Million bell plants grow in hardy zones of 9 to 11 and mature 3 to 9 inches tall and 6 to 24 inches spread.

Million bell plants are primarily grown in hanging baskets where their bountiful masses of bright green foliage and gorgeous flowers gracefully spill over the sides. In addition, Million bell flowers bloom from spring to frost and range in various colors, including white, pink, magenta, red, yellow, blue, violet, and bronze.

Like Clematis, million bell plants thrive in full sun or partial shade and prefer to be planted in rich, moist, and well-draining soil. However, million bell plants thrive in evenly moist soil, ensuring that the soil never dries out completely.

Million bell plants are spectacular in hanging baskets or for other ornamental purposes.

14. Dalmatian Bellflower

Dalmatian bellflower with lilac blossoms and tiny, dark green foliage.

Campanula portenschlagiana is a low-growing herbaceous perennial native to the Dalmatian mountains of Croatia and Herzegovina. The Dalmatian Bellflower is hardy to zones 4 to 8 and grows 3 to 6 inches tall and 6 to 12 inches wide.

Dalmatian bellflowers are one of the most popular bellflowers, with low-growing evergreen rosettes of tiny, heart-shaped foliage. In spring, the Dalmatian bellflower bears mounds of violet-blue, bell-shaped blooms.

Like Clematis, Dalmatian bellflowers thrive in full sun to partial shade and one inch of weekly watering to thrive. However, Dalmatian bellflowers prefer medium moist and well-drained soil.

Dalmatian bellflowers are ornamentals perfect for borders.

15. Japanese Wisteria

Japanese wisteria with clusters of pea-like flowers blooming in a park.

Wisteria Floribunda is a vigorous deciduous climbing vine native to Japan. The Japanese Wisteria is hardy to zones 4 to 9 and grows 10 to 25 feet tall and 4 to 8 feet wide.

Japanese Wisteria has attractive and dense, green pinnate foliage with larges mounds of drooping clusters of fragrant, florescence pea-like flowers.

Japanese Wisteria needs at least 6 hours of full sun and moist, well-draining soil to bloom efficiently like Clematis. Japanese Wisteria prefers consistently moist soil during the first year but only needs watering during drought periods after maturing.

Japanese Wisteria’s bark is used to make rope and sandals.

16. Princess Flower

Princess flower with vivid purple blooms and matching purple stamens.

Tibouchina urvilleana is an upright, tropical evergreen shrub or small tree native to Brazil. Princess flowers are hardy to zones 9 to 11 and grow 10 to 20 feet tall and 6 to 10 feet wide.

The Princess flower boasts elliptic, soft-haired, green foliage with red edges and prominent veins. In summer and year-round in tropical areas, the Princess flower boats ravishing dark purple flowers with matching purple stamens.

The Princess flower thrives in full sun, similar to the Clematis, but prefers partial shade in the afternoons in hot climates. In addition, the Princess flower thrives in rich, well-draining, and slightly acidic soil. The Princess flower has similar water requirements to the Clematis, so provide approximately 1 inch of water per week to the plant.

Princess flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies to gardens all season long.

17. Tropical Hibiscus

Tropical hibiscus with bright yellow flowers accentuated with red centers and yellow stamens.

Hibiscus rosa-Sinensis is an evergreen shrub native to Asia. The Tropical Hibiscus is hardy to zones 9 to 11 and grows 4 to 10 feet tall and 5 to 8 feet wide.

Tropical Hibiscus is a vigorous growing shrub with vibrant, bold trumpet-shaped flowers with dramatic yellow stamens almost all year round in frost-free conditions. Tropical Hibiscus flowers range in pure white, pink, peach, orange, bright yellow, purple, and red.

Like Clematis, the Tropical Hibiscus thrives in full sun to partial shade and moist but well-drained soil types. However, the Tropical Hibiscus is a thirsty shrub requiring at least one to two inches of water weekly.

Tropical hibiscus traditionally treats cancer, lower blood pressure, dry coughs, and topically treat skin afflictions.

18. Rugosa Rose

Close-up of rugosa rose with vivid pink, ruffled blooms and serrated green foliage.

Rosa rugosa is an incredibly hardy deciduous flowering shrub native to Eastern Russia, Korea, Japan, and northern China. Rugosa roses grow in a hardiness zone of 3 to 9 and mature to 4 to 8 feet tall and 4 to 6 feet spread.

Rugosa rose bushes are vigorous and tough shrubs, especially for their handsome, wrinkly, bright green foliage and vicious thorns. However, these beautiful, rugged shrubs display an array of remarkably fragrant small pink flowers in late spring with dainty yellow stamens. In addition, Rugosa roses produce colorful “hips” or pods that resemble cherry tomatoes.

Like Clematis, Rugosa roses thrive in full sun to partial shade and have average water requirements of weekly watering. In addition, the Rugosa thrives in rich, well-draining, and slightly acidic soil.

The Rugosa can treat irregular menstruation and gastritis. In addition, the rose hips are edible and perfect for making jams, syrups, or tea.

19. Passionflower

Close-up of passionflower with purple blooms highlighted with blue filaments.

Passiflora spp., exotic passionflowers, is a perennial vine native to North America and South America. Passionflowers are hardy to zones 5 to 9 and grow 6 to 30 feet tall and 3 to 6 feet wide.

Add an exotic touch to spruce your garden with this gorgeous climber. Passionflowers have twining tendrils and deep blue-green lobed leaves. Passionflowers bear striking blooms in summer with large, flat white base petals and long skirts of vibrant red, purple, or blue filaments.

Similar to Clematis, Passionflowers thrive in full sun to partial shade. However, Passionflowers require deep watering once or twice per week. In addition, the Passionflower thrives in average, well-draining soil.

Passionflowers treat anxiety and sleep problems and pain, heart rhythm problems, and menopausal symptoms.

20. Climbing Prairie Rose

Climbing prairie rose with pale pink flowers and yellow stamens.

Rosa setigera, the climbing prairie rose, is a delicate deciduous shrub or vine native to eastern and central North America. The Climbing Prairie Rose is hardy to zones 5 to 8 and grows 6 to 12 inches and 8 to 10 inches wide.

Climbing Prairie roses consists of length climbing branches with lustrous, dark green foliage that turns to beautiful red, crimson, or purple leaflets in fall. During late spring, the Climbing Prairie displays charming, five-petaled pale pink flowers with showy golden stamens.

Similar to Clematis, the Climbing Prairie Rose thrives in at least 6 hours of full sun. In addition, the Climbing Prairie Rose prefers evenly moist, well-draining soil. The Climbing Prairie Rose has average watering requirements once established. So, deeply water your plant once a week.

Climbing Prairie Roses attract butterflies, bees, and birds with their beautiful, slightly fragrant blooms.

21. Mock Orange

Macro photo of mock orange with snow white blossoms and yellow stamens.

Philadelphus coronarius is a deciduous flowering shrub native to Europe. Mock orange shrubs grow in hardy zones 4 to 8 and mature to 10 to 12 feet tall with a similar spread.

A mock orange shrub has a dense, round growth habit and boasts brilliant yellow, ovate leaves, which later mature to glossy, deep green. The mock orange bears abundant inflorescences of highly fragrant, four-petaled, cup-shaped white fluorescence in late spring. The blooms resemble orange blossoms, giving it its common name.

Mock orange and Clematis have similarities, including sun preferences full sun to partial shade and loamy, moist, and well-draining soil.  In addition, mock oranges need approximately 1 inch of water per week, similar to the Clematis.

Dried powdered leaves of the mock orange can treat swollen and painful joints (similar to Clematis).

22. Balloon Flower

Balloon flowers with lilac blossoms and serrated green foliage.

Platycodon grandifloras is a clump-forming perennial native to China, Korea, Japan, and Russia. Balloon flowers are hardy to zones 3 to 8 and mature 1 to 2 ½ feet tall with a similar spread.

Balloon flowers are vigorous and floriferous herbaceous perennials with upright stems and medium-green foliage. In summer, Balloon flowers produce bountiful balloon-like buds that open into flaring, vibrant blue flowers atop their upright stems.

Like Clematis, Balloon flowers thrive in full sun to partial shade and rich, loamy, well-draining soil. However, Balloon flowers prefer uniformly moist soil, so water your plant as soon as the soil dries out.

The roots of Balloon flowers still serve as Chinese herbal medicine for lung and throat ailments.

23. Asters

Asters with purple star-shaped flowers accentuated with yellow centers.

Symphyotrichum is an herbaceous perennial native to North America. Asters grow in hardy zones 3 to 8 and mature to 1 to 6 feet tall and 1 to 4 feet wide.

Asters provide an exciting splash of color during the late season. This summer to fall bloomer creates a large display of large, fluffy, star-shaped flowers with yellow button centers. Aster’s blooms are generally white, pink, purple, or blue.

Similar to Clematis, Asters thrive in full sun and loamy, well-drained soil. Asters also have similar water requirements to Clematis and need a base-watering of approximately one inch per week.

Asters treat rheumatism, spasms, and irregular menstruation.

24. Garden Phlox

Macro photo of garden phlox with pale pink blossoms and purple centers.

Phlox paniculata is an herbaceous perennial native to the Eastern United States. Garden Phlox thrives in hardy zones of 4 to 8 and matures 2 to 4 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide.

The Garden Phlox is famous for its long-lasting blooms during the summer. It is an upright, clump-forming perennial with attractive green foliage and panicles of slightly fragrant flowers. The Garden Phlox’s blooms range in various colors, including salmon, lilac, pure white, magenta, and cherry red.

Like Clematis, the Garden Phlox thrives in full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. However, the Garden Phlox requires consistently moist soil. In addition, try to keep the foliage dry as the plant is prone to mildew.

The entire Garden Phlox plant is used to make tea to treat stomach and intestinal problems.

25. Bidens

Bidens with orange and yellow flowers growing in a summer garden.

Bidens belongs to the aster family with over 200 Biden species. Bidens can be grown as annuals or perennials and are native to Asia, Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Polynesia. Bidens are hardy to zones 8 to 11 and mature to 6 to 12 inches tall and 1 to 3 feet wide.

Bidens are beautiful plants with gorgeous evergreen foliage. Bidens typically bloom yellow or orange flowers in summer; however, newer varieties include white, gold, and pink blossoms. Bidens are well-known for their tiny, sticky seeds that cling to clothing and animal fur.

Like Clematis, Bidens grow well in full sun to partial shade and require 1 inch of weekly watering. Bidens tolerate most well-draining soil types but prefer rich, humus soil.

Bidens have properties that can treat malaria, skin infections, and stomach and liver disorders.

References:

Gardenia

The Spruce: Plants A to Z

Old Farmer’s Almanac: GROWING CLEMATIS

College of Agriculture & Natural Resources: An Introduction to Clematis

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