18 Flowers Similar to Alstroemeria - Home Stratosphere

18 Flowers Similar to Alstroemeria

Here are 18 alternative flowers similar to alstroemeria that offer equally outstanding blooms perfect for flower arrangements or in an ornamental garden and the like.

Alstroemeria flowers with red markings and bright green foliage.

Alstroemeria, part of the Amaryllidaceae family, is a herbaceous perennial flower commonly referred to as the Peruvian Lilly and also known as Lily of the Incas or St Martin’s Flower. The exotic flower originated in South America and was most prevalent in Chile and Peru.

The Peruvian Lilly will thrive in the USDA zones 7 – 10, as it wants a moist woodland habitat, though it is drought tolerant to a degree. The plant is fully hardy and thrives in full sun but tolerates semi-shade well. Growing at a mellow rate, it can reach a height of around 36 inches.

With lance-shaped leaves, trumpet-like flowers in a range of vibrant colors, the Peruvian Lilly is commonly used in flower arrangements. Flowering times for this stunning flower are during summer and autumn.

There are cases where people show sensitivity to the flower, especially contact dermatitis. It is recommended to work with nitrile gloves to prevent such a reaction when handling the Peruvian Lilly.

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Related: Sun-Loving Flowers | Water-Loving Flowers | Shade-Loving Flowers | Types of Flowers | Types of Flowers by Color | Types of Flowers by Alphabet | Types of Flower Colors

1. Daffodil

Bright yellow blooms of wild daffodil growing atop its long, green stalks.

Narcissus pseudonarcissus is known as Wild Daffodil, Daffodil, or Narcissus and belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in Western Europe. The Daffodil is suited for USDA zones 4 – 8.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to around 12 inches, with narrow leaves and bright yellow trumpet-like flowers. While the entire pretty plant is poisonous, the oil of the Daffodil is used in the manufacturing of perfumes.

The Daffodil is a hardy plant that blooms in the springtime and can withstand most climates as long as the soil is moist – but not necessarily wet. The flowers can endure shadeless areas, but semi-shade is the best.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, herbaceous perennial, sensitivity to allergens/poisonous, origin, trumpet-like flower, moist soil, and semi-shade.

2. Atamasco Lily

Macro image of atamasco lily flower with vivid pink blooms and long yellow stamens.

Zephyranthes atamasca is commonly referred to as Atamasco Lily. Also known as the Rain lily, Easter lily, or Zephyr lily, and belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in Southern America. The Atamasco thrives in USDA zones 7 – 10.

The perennial plant can grow up to 15 inches, with grassy leaves and star-like flowers typical in white. The leaves and bulbs of the Atamasco lily are poisonous; the plant has no particular uses but for flower arrangements.

The Atamasco is frost hardy plant that and tolerates most climates as long as the soil is moist and full sun; however, some semi-shade is ok. Flowering seasons are spring, summer, and autumn.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, perennial, sensitivity to allergens/poisonous, USDA zones, flowering time.

3. Snowdrop

Snowdrop blossoms with strappy leaves covered in morning dew.

Galanthus nivalis, called Snowdrop, or Common Snowdrop, belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in Europe. The Snowdrop is suited for USDA zones 3 – 9.

The bulbous perennial plant can grow up to 8 inches, with short grassy leaves and nodding white bell-like flowers. The sweet-scented blooms are a favorite in gardens, but care should be taken when handling the bulb as it is somewhat poisonous.

The Snowdrop is a fully hardy plant that can withstand most climates with moist soil. The flower likes a semi-shaded area and blooms in early spring and late winter.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, perennial, sensitivity to allergens/poisonous, fully hardy, moist soil, and semi-shade.

4. Summer Snowflake

Bell-like blooms of a summer snowflake hanging from its green stalk.

Leucojum (aestivum) is commonly referred to as the Summer Snowflake, belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family, and originated in vast parts of Europe. The Summer Snowflake thrives in USDA zones 4 – 9.

The perennial plant can grow up to around 35 inches, with long green leaves and cernuous green-tipped white bell-like flowers.  According to Science Direct, the Summer Snowflake produces galantamine which is used for anesthesia and neuropathic pain.

The Summer Snowflake is a fully hardy plant that can withstand most climates as long as the soil is moist to wet and with fun sun or partial shade. The flowering time for the Snowflake is late spring.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, perennial, sensitivity to allergens/poisonous, fully hardy, moist soil, full sun, and semi-shade.

5. Spider Lily

Close-up of a spider lily flower with bright red petals and long, burgundy stamens.

Lycoris Radiata is commonly referred to as the Spider lily and also known as the Nerine lily or the Short tube Lycoris and belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in Eastern Asia. The Spider lily is suited for USDA zones 8 – 10.

The perennial plant can grow up to 20 inches, with long narrow leaf-less stems holding fiery red blooms that closely mimic a spider. Spider lilies have medicinal properties such as the treatment of swellings and ulcers.

The Spider lily is a fully hardy plant that can survive most climates with moist soil and full sun. These lilies bloom from late summer through autumn to spring.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, perennial, fully hardy, moist soil, full sun, flowering time.

6. Prairie Rose Gentian

Prairie rose gentian with star-like purple blooms accentuated with yellow centers.

Sabatia campestris is called the Prairie Rose Gentian but also known as Meadow Pink or the Texas Star and belongs to the Gentianaceae family, originating in south-central parts of the United States. The Prairie Rose Gentian is suited for USDA zones 6 – 8.

The annual/biennial plant can grow up to 20 inches, with flat green leaves and colorful star-like flowers in shades of purple and pink. While there is no indication of what part of the plant is used, tonic teas are produced, preventing periodic returns from disease.

The Prairie Rose Gentian is not frost-hardy but thrives in full sun or semi-shade with moist soil and blooms from April through July.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: perennial, sensitivity to allergens/poisonous, moist soil, flowering time, full sun, and semi-shade.

7. Tiger Lily

Tiger lily with orange blooms adorned with black dots and long stamens.

Lilium lancifolium is known as the Tiger lily or Devil lily and belongs to the Liliaceae family, originating in Eastern Asia. The Tiger lily is suited for USDA zones 4 – 8.

The herbaceous perennials plant can grow up to 60 inches, with long pointy leaves and trumpet-like flowers most common in orange. The flowers and roots are edible (just avoid the pollen). It has anti-inflammatory diuretic, emmenagogue, emollient and expectorant properties.

The Tiger lily is a fully hardy plant that can withstand most climates as long as the soil is moist. The flowers can endure some shade, but full sun or semi-shade is the best. These lilies bloom from autumn to late summer.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: herbaceous perennial, fully hardy, moist soil, full sun, semi-shade, trumpet-like flowers, flowering time.

8. Bellwort

Bellwort plant with yellow bell-like flowers and green, oval leaves.

Uvularia grandiflora, commonly referred to as Bellwort, Sessileleaf Bellwort Bellflowers, or Merrybells, originated in eastern North America.  There is conflicting information about the flower’s family; sources list Uvulariaceae,  Colchicaceae,  Liliaceae,  Convallariaceae, and Ruscaceae. The Bellwort is suited for USDA zones 4 – 8.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to 12 inches, with oval leaves and bright yellow drooping bell-like flowers. The leaves and roots are edible, and tea can be made from the roots to cure an upset stomach.

The Bellwort is a fully hardy plant that wants moist soil and lots of shade, but semi-shade should also work. The flowering season for this plant is during May and June.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: herbaceous perennial, moist soil, and flowering season.

9. Martagon Lily

Macro photo of martagon lily with curly vibrant pink blooms and short leaves.

Lilium martagon is called the Martagon lily, but also known as Turk’s Cap lily, or Mountain lily that belongs to the Liliaceae family and originated in Europe and Western Asia. The Martagon lily thrives in USDA zones 4 – 8.

The bulbous perennial plant can grow up 50 inches, with short oval leaves and colorful trumpet-like flowers. The lily has medicinal properties that are used to treat heart diseases.

The Martagon Lily is fully hardy, can withstand most climates as long as the soil is moist, and has full sun or semi-shade. Flowers bloom in the summertime.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: perennial, trumpet-like flower, moist soil, full sun, semi-shade, and flowering time. 

10. Sea Daffodil

Pristine white blooms of a sea daffodil growing on a desert.

Pancratium maritimum is commonly referred to as Sea Daffodil, or Sea lily that belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in Europe. The Sea Daffodil is suited for USDA zones 7 – 10.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to around 13 inches, with white trumpet-like flowers. While the roots and seeds are edible, however, the bulbs are poisonous to an extent.

The Sea Daffodil is frost-hardy that wants full sun and soil that is between moist and well-drained.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, herbaceous perennial, USDA zones, sensitivity to allergens/poisonous, trumpet-like flower, moist soil, full sun, and flowering time.

11. Aztec Lily

Close-up of aztec lily with with bright red blossom and strappy foliage.

Sprekelia formosissima, called the Aztec lily or the Jacobean, belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family, originating in Southern Mexico. The Aztec is suited for USDA zones 8 – 12.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to 20 inches, with long, narrow leaves and bright red, almost spider-like flowers. The Aztec lily doesn’t have much use other than looking magnificent in your garden.  

The lily is not frost-hardy and thrives in moist soil and full sun, blooming in the springtime.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, herbaceous perennial, moist soil, and full sun.

12. Spring Starflower

Masses of blue blossoms of spring starflower adorned with tiny, yellow centers.

Ipheion uniflorum is commonly referred to as the Spring Starflower, also known as the Charlotte Bishop, Mexican Star, or Starlikes. It belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in Uruguay, Argentina, and Chile. The Spring Starflower is suited for USDA zones 5 – 9.

The bulbous perennial plant can grow up to 19 inches, with grassy leaves and star-like flowers in blue or purple. The Spring Starflower doesn’t have any unique uses or hazards but is fragrant and makes beautiful additions to a garden.

The Spring Starflower is a fully hardy plant that can survive in most climates with moist to well-drained soil and full sun. Blooms in late winter through springtime.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, perennial, moist soil, and full sun.

13. Autumn Daffodil

Autumn daffodil with bright yellow flowers growing in a rock garden.

Sternbergia lutea, called the Autumn Daffodil or Winter Daffodil, belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in Southern Europe. The Autumn Daffodil is suited for USDA zones 6 – 9.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to 19 inches, with long, upright, narrow leaves and bright yellow star-like flowers. The Autumn Daffodil doesn’t have any hazards and makes is commonly used in flower arrangements.

The Autumn Daffodil is a fully hardy plant that seeks full sun and well-drained soil. Flowering time is during autumn (September to October).

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, herbaceous perennial, full sun, and flower arrangements.

14. Orange River Lily

Orange river lily with large trumpet-like flowers sitting atop its green stalk.

Crinum bulbispermum is commonly referred to as the Orange River Lily and is also known as the Hardy Swamp lily or the Bengal lily. It belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and originated in South Africa. The Orange River Lily is suited for USDA zones 5 – 9.

The bulbous perennial plant can grow up to 36 inches, with grassy leaves and almost trumpet-like flowers in a vibrant range of colors. Reports indicate that the Orange River Lily is poisonous to mammals.

The Orange River Lily is fully hardy and blooms in the summertime; it can withstand most climates with full sun and moist soil. 

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, perennial, sensitivity to allergens/poisonous, trumpet-like flower, fully hardy, moist soil, and full sun.

15. River Lily

River lily with pale pink blossoms graced with dark stripes and long stamens.

Crinum latifolium, called the River lily or Veld lily, belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family and grows in America, Africa, southern Asia, and Australia. The River lily is suited for USDA zones 8 – 12 (conjecture).

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to 78 inches, with long, broad leaves and trumpet-like flowers. The Indian Crinum latifolium was traditionally used to treat rheumatism, fistula, and tumors (amongst other conditions).

The River Lily is fully hardy and can withstand most climates as long as the soil is wet and the plant receives full sun; however, it tolerated semi-shade well in soaked soil.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: Amaryllidaceae family, herbaceous perennial, trumpet-like flower, fully hardy, and full sun.

16. Wood Lily

Macro image of a wood lily with bright orange bloom adorned with dark markings, yellow accents, and long stamens.

Lilium philadelphicum, commonly referred to as the Wood lily, belongs to the Liliaceae family and originated in North America. The Wood Lily is suited for USDA zones 4 – 8.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to 36 inches, with grassy leaves and star to trumpet-like flowers. The roots of this lily are edible, and bulbs can be made into a tea that treats stomach ailments, coughs, and fevers.  

The Wood lily is fully hardy, thrives in moist soil, full sun, and tolerates semi-shade well. Flowering time is between summer and autumn.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: herbaceous perennial, trumpet-like flower, fully hardy, flowering time, moist soil, semi-shade, and full sun.

17. Bigroot Geranium

Bigroot geranium with small, purple blooms hanging on it slim stalks.

Geranium macrorrhizum is called the Bigroot Geranium or the  Big-root Cranesbill, belongs to the Geraniaceae family, and originated in Central Europe. Bigroot Geraniumis suited for USDA zones 4 – 8.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to 19 inches, with flat, broad leaves and reversed trumpet-like flowers. There appears to be some mention that the plant possesses aphrodisiac properties; however, no further indication is given. 

The Wood lily is fully hardy and can survive just about any environment, full sun, semi-shade, and full shade. The Bigroot Geranium blooms in the summertime.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: herbaceous perennial, trumpet-like flower, fully hardy, flowering time, moist soil, semi-shade, and full sun.

18. Trailing Bellflower

Trailing bellflower with masses of lilac blooms complemented with serrated foliage.

Campanula poscharskyana is generally referred to as the Trailing Bellflower, belongs to the Campanulaceae family and originated in Europe. The Trailing Bellflower is suited for USDA zones 3 – 7.

The herbaceous perennial plant can grow up to 12 inches, with short, flat leaves and star or bell-like flowers, common in blue. The flowers and leaves of the Trailing Bellflower are edible and can be mixed into summer salads.

The plant is fully hardy, thrives in moist soil, full sun, and tolerates semi-shade well. Flowering time is between summer and autumn.

Similarities to Alstroemeria: herbaceous perennial, fully hardy, flowering time, moist soil, semi-shade, and full sun.

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