in

30 of the Best Flowers for Dried Flowers (Amazing Flower Decor)

The best flowers for dried flowers.

Few crafts have been done as long as drying flowers. Drying flowers allows you to preserve the beauty of a flower and use them in a variety of other items like soap and cardstock. But before you dry, you need flowers. Continue reading for some of the best flowers for drying crafts.

The art of drying flowers has been both a hobby and a scientific pursuit for centuries. It allowed early scientists to better study and understand plantlife while individuals often dried flowers to preserve their color and scent, and to bring the outdoors inside. Dried flowers are perhaps best known for their decorative purposes, but they also have more practical benefits, including use in cooking, potpourri, and homemade body care products.

But before you start looking up DIY soap recipes and candle making tutorials, first you have to start with the main ingredient, the flowers. The following is a looks at some fantastic flower varieties that generations of crafters before you have found to be perfect for dried flower pursuits:

1. Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa)

Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa)

Dried Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa)

Also sometimes called the fireworks flower, globe amaranth is a showy flower that looks very much like hot pink pom-poms. This look makes for an ideal splash of color in dried arrangements.

Requirements:

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 2-11

2. Strawflower (Helichrysum bracteatum)

Strawflower (Helichrysum bracteatum)

Dried Strawflower (Helichrysum bracteatum)

This bright and sun-loving flower blooms from late spring to the first frost and really brings color to the season. It’s ideal for dried flower arrangements and artwork thanks to its ability to retain that bright color and shape.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 8-10

3. Curry Plant (Helichrysum italicum)

Curry Plant (Helichrysum italicum)

Oil and dried Curry Plant (Helichrysum italicum).

The curry plant is a close relative to the strawflower but it boats a primarily yellow, sun-kissed color that is ideal in arrangements. Curry plant is also renowned for its spicy fragrance and it was once known as a powerful aphrodisiac.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 8-11

4. Snowflake (Hydrangea quercifolia)

Snowflake (Hydrangea quercifolia)

Dried Snowflake (Hydrangea quercifolia)

The gorgeous flowers of the snowflake can bloom as large as 12 inches in diameter, first opening up in late spring. These creamy-white flowers are ideal for dried bouquets and use in card stock. When pressing, use care as the petals are delicate.

  • Sun needs: Lots to moderate
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 5-9

5. Drumstick Allium (Allium sphaerocephalon)

Drumstick Allium (Allium sphaerocephalon)

Dried Drumstick Allium (Allium sphaerocephalon)

Drumstick Allium boasts a beautiful egg-shaped flower atop a slender stem. This flower slowly turns from green to purple as it matures and is renowned for its long life after being cut.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 1-11

6. Love Lies Bleeding (Amaranthus caudatus)

Love Lies Bleeding (Amaranthus caudatus)

Dried Love Lies Bleeding (Amaranthus caudatus)

This plant’s bright magenta and crimson flowers look great for dried arrangements but long lies bleeding has also been valued for its medicinal properties, including its use as an astringent, anthelmintic, and diuretic.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 2-11

7. False Saffron (Carthamus tinctorius)

False Saffron (Carthamus tinctorius)

Dried False Saffron (Carthamus tinctorius)

Need help with your landscaping? Get up to 4 quotes from top landscaping companies near you (search by your zip code). No obligation. CLICK HERE.

False saffron has long been a highly valued plant that was once used primarily for the rich orange-yellow dies it helped produce. Today, dried false saffron is great for use in potpourris and dried arrangements.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 2-11

8. Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

Dried Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

Sometimes also referred to as Bachelor’s Button, this flower blooms for several months and are excellent flowers for cutting and drying.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 2-11

9. Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Dried Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

Native to the Mediterranean area, cardoon is a large thistle-like flower that serves as a strong centerpiece in a dried floral bouquet or similar arrangement.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 7-10

10. Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Dried Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Lavender is undoubtedly one of the most well known of flowers and its soft purple flowers are often highly sought after. You can use lavender in dried arrangements, potpourri, cooking, and so much more. If you already grow herbs, then you likely have a lavender growing and if you’ don’t, then make this the season you add it.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 5-9

11. Conebush (Leucadendron)

Conebush (Leucadendron)

Dried Conebush (Leucadendron)

Conebush is is a bright red flower that blooms in spring. When dried, it makes for a beautiful addition to a floral bouquet or home arrangement. Conebrush is also a wonderful flower to press and add to your scrapbook or other floral collection.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 9-11

12. Gayfeather (Liastris spicata)

Gayfeather (Liastris spicata)

Dried Gayfeather (Liastris spicata)

The tufted flower heads of the gayfeather bloom for over four weeks and are highly attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds. They are likewise easy to cut and dry to use for your crafting projects. Press the gayfeather and add it festive wreaths or bouquets, or tuck it into gift bags.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-9

13. Statice (Linonium sinuatum)

Statice (Linonium sinuatum)

Dried Statice (Linonium sinuatum)

Statice is an incredibly popular flower to grow for drying purposes thanks to its mix of colors and how well those colors hold up throughout the drying process. Grow varieties of every color for a robust drying season. Just a dozen statice flowers can make for a vibrant and highly desirable floral arrangement.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 8-10

14. Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

Dried Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

The black-eyed Susan is a brilliant yellow flower that gardeners everywhere love for its being virtually trouble-free and easy to grow. Their wide yellow petals are ideal for pressing against cardstock and in similar crafting ventures. If you’re looking to grow a garden of primarily arrangement-friendly flowers, then black-eyed Susans are a must-have.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 5-8

15. Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

Dried Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

Tansy was once harvested and sued as a short-term treatment for worm infestations and similar gut issues. Today, while not used medicinally anymore, many gardeners still praise it for its ability to repel insects and its fresh scent. Cut and dry the tansy to use as a potpourri. Left pressed for a week or so, the tansy flower also makes a great addition to a personal flower collection or for use in gifts like within a card or tucked between ribbons.

  • Sun needs: Lots to moderate
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-8

16. Lollipop (Verbena bonariensis)

Lollipop (Verbena bonariensis)

Dried Lollipop (Verbena bonariensis)

The lollipop flower blooms in a myriad of dense clusters of tiny purple flowers that range from a soft lavender shade to a deep violet. These tiny flowers are great for adding to a dried bouquet or to crush and use in a paper. If you’re looking to make potpourri, crush a bunch of lollipops and use them along with a richer scent like cinnamon.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 7-10

17. Common Milkweed (Ascelpias syriaca)

Common Milkweed (Ascelpias syriaca)

Dried Common Milkweed (Ascelpias syriaca)

The common milkweed is arguably the most vital flower for monarch butterflies and if you live in the path of their migration, you should strongly consider adding the flower to your garden. Plus, once bloomed, you can nicely use the sed pods in your dried floral arrangments

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-9

18. Annie Wylam (Camellia japonica)

Annie Wylam (Camellia japonica)

Dried Annie Wylam (Camellia japonica)

The soft pink flowers of the Annie Wylam bloom for several months across the cooler months. There are several varieties of the camellia japonica, but the Annie Wylam is a particularly hardy breed. Note that when pressed, it may lose some of its pinkish hue. The Annie Wylam also makes for a good pick in floral arrangements and small bouquets like corsages where you want to compliment deeper hued flowers, such as roses.

  • Sun needs: Minimal to moderate
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 7-9

19. Bluebell (Campanula rotundifolla)

Bluebell (Campanula rotundifolla)

Dried Bluebell (Campanula rotundifolla)

The bluebell is a delicate and graceful flower that is native to northern parts of Asia, Europe, and North America — pretty ubiquitous for such a tiny flower. This flower can be easily pressed and added to things like candles, paper, and soap to bring that soft natural blue indoors. Dried bluebells are also great for spring and summer table bouquets.

  • Sun needs: Moderate to lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-6

20. Orange Lily (Lilium bulbiferum var. croceum)

Orange Lily (Lilium bulbiferum var. croceum)

Dried Orange Lily (Lilium bulbiferum var. croceum)

The orange lily is undoubtedly amongst the most beautiful of all lilies with its brilliant sunset-esque color with dark chocolate flecks. The wild lily can be readily grown by the average gardener and its colorful petals are ideal for use in dried floral projects.

  • Sun needs: Moderate to lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-9

 

21. Yarrow (Achillea)

Yarrow (Achillea)

Dried Yarrow (Achillea)

Yarrow is a graceful perennial wildflower that is native to Siberia and its surrounding regions. Its tiny flowers make for a great addition to any dried flower bouquet or they can serve as the perfect touch to a card or similar gift.  If you want to press yarrow, be sure to take care as the petals are more fragile than others on this list. Use high-quality blotting paper and don’t use too much weight.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-9

22. Globe Thistle (Echinops bannaticus)

Globe Thistle (Echinops bannaticus)

Dried Globe Thistle (Echinops bannaticus)

Perfectly round, the globe thistle has a striking appearance when dried. You can even cut it before the buds have fully opened to watch them slowly open indoors in your own dried bouquet.

  • Sun needs: Lots to moderate
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 4-9

23. Viola (Viola sororia)

Viola (Viola sororia)

Dried Viola (Viola sororia)

Such a gorgeous and delicate purple flower, the viola is a fantastic addition to any garden. This hardy flower can even thrive in winter given the right attention. And once it has flowers, be sure to cut and dry appropriately to bring that color into your home.

  • Sun needs: Lots to moderate
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 5-8

24. Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila paniculata)

Baby's Breath (Gypsophila paniculata)

Dried Baby's Breath (Gypsophila paniculata)

Baby’s breath is one of the most popular flowers for florists and those who specialize in floral arrangements. Its flowers are small, yet its willowy stems and billowy yet delicate petals are perfect for things like corsages.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-9

25. African Daisy (Arctosis)

African Daisy (Arctosis)

Dried African Daisy (Arctosis)

The African daisy is a lot flatter than other varieties of daisies, which make them ideal for pressing and use in things like scrapbooking and gift cards. Simply layer the flower between blotting paper and allow to dry for two weeks or so.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Little
  • Soil pH: Acid, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 9-11

26. Floss Flower (Ageratum houstonianum)

Floss Flower (Ageratum houstonianum)

Dried Floss Flower (Ageratum houstonianum)

A tall plant, the floss flower booms fluffy round clusters of purple-blue flowers that are ideal for bouquets and indoor dried arrangements.

  • Sun needs: Lots to moderate
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 2-12

27. Mealy Cup Sage (Salvia farinacea)

Mealy Cup Sage (Salvia farinacea)

Dried Mealy Cup Sage (Salvia farinacea)

This multi-branched flower looks very much like lavender but is a bit harder and a good choice for those who live in cooler areas. Like lavender, the mealy cup sage is a long-lasting flower that makes for great cut bouquets and dried arrangements.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 8-10

28. Peony (Paeonia lactiflora ‘Do Tell’)

Peony (Paeonia lactiflora 'Do Tell')

Dried Peony (Paeonia lactiflora 'Do Tell')

This Chinese peony boasts a gorgeous and large pink blossom that densely packed with golden-yellow and rose center staminodes. The peony is an ideal choice to add to your arrangement-oriented garden due to it having both a desirable scent and its reputation for holding up well to being dried or pressed. Just note that they can take up to two years to bloom, so be patient and plant in early fall for best effects.

  • Sun needs: Lots to moderate
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-8

29. Siberian Iris (Iris sibirica)

Siberian Iris (Iris sibirica)

Dried Siberian Iris (Iris sibirica)

A delicate flower, the deep purple petals and pale yellow signals of the Siberian iris make it a valued pick for pressing and dried flower crafts like soap making. If you are looking to try papermaking, then you’ll particularly love how the bright purple flecks of the Siberian iris will stand out in your finished product.

  • Sun needs: Lots to moderate
  • Water: Moderate
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-8

30. Poppy (Papaver commutatum ‘Ladybird’)

Poppy (Papaver commutatum 'Ladybird')

Dried Poppy (Papaver commutatum 'Ladybird')

Poppies come in a rich variety and all add brilliant color to any garden. The ladybird poppy is especially beautiful due to its brilliant crimson flowers and unique large black spot. This flower typically blooms for several months throughout late spring and into midsummer. Note that towards that midsummer peak, the flowers will give way to ornamental seedpods so you want to cut and dry before then.

  • Sun needs: Lots
  • Water: Moderate to low
  • Soil pH: Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Hardiness zone: 3-10
2



This aerial view focuses on the house's exterior and the stunning natural landscape surrounding it. Images courtesy of Toptenrealestatedeals.com.

Slush Puppie Fly’n R Ranch in Umatilla, FL (Listed for $3.9 million)

A lovely bowl of vegan fried rice.

My Easy Vegan Fried Rice Recipe