9 Chain Link Fence Ideas for Residential Homes


See 9 examples of chain link fence ideas for your home (backyard and front yard) plus learn the cost, advantages and disadvantages of chain link fences.

Squirrels frolicking on a chain link fence with a lovely planting bed in the foreground.

Welcome to our guide to picking the very best chain link fence for your residential home!

Chain link fencing is a type of woven fence that is primarily made out of galvanized or LLDPE-coated steel wire. Uncoated steel wire tends to corrode easily, damaging the fence and creating an eyesore.

Chain link fencing is a popular low-cost option for residential homes, although it’s found mainly in backyards. The open weave will not obscure sunlight on either side of the fence, nor will it obscure your view beyond the fence.

Should you desire more privacy, opaque slats can be inserted into the characteristic diamond-pattern mesh. However, this isn’t a popular option, as the slats are more easily damaged and may need replacing.

When considering choosing a chain link fence for your home, there are many factors to consider. We’ll outline the pros and cons to a chain link fence:

Pros:

  1. Low cost – Chain link fences are relatively inexpensive, particularly when compared to wooden privacy fences.
  2. Security – Chain link fences are available in various heights.
  3. Durability – The galvanized steel construction means that they will resist rust and damage much longer than a wooden fence.
  4. Simple to Repair – Should a section of your fence be damaged, it can be easily replaced and look exactly like the rest of the fence.
  5. Visibility – Great for pets and children; you will always be able to see what’s happening outside your yard.

Cons:

  1. Security – This is also a definite con; you can’t really add barbed wire to the top of a residential chain link fence to make it more secure, and incredibly high fencing options are an eyesore or may even be prohibited by local regulations. The typical residential fence can easily be climbed over.
  2. Appearance – Due to its association with industrial complexes, chain link fences are considered generic and pedestrian. Great for fencing in a backyard, but not a great option for curb appeal.
  3. Lack of Privacy – If privacy is what you crave, a see-through chain link fence is definitely not for you. Even the addition of privacy slats won’t keep the neighbors from peeping over your 4  or 5 foot tall fence!

Cost of Chain Link Fences

So chain link fences are definitely a low cost option, but how much will you be spending? On average, expect to pay between 60 and 70 dollars for a 50 foot roll of chain link fencing. (Sources: Home Depot, Lowe’s)

Depending on the gauge size and height of your fence, you can expect to pay upwards of 100 dollars. In addition to purchasing the “fabric” for your fence, you’ll also need to purchase fence posts, which cost on average 10 to 16 dollars per line post. Terminal posts may cost upwards of 20 dollars per post. (Sources: Home Depot, Lowe’s)

There are a thousand and one ways to customize a chain link fence, and accessories to match. If a colorful fence is what you desire, you can purchase chain link fences in colors like green, black, or the classic silver.

You may choose to add railings to the top of your fence, post caps, or even an access gate. These are additional costs that you must weigh before deciding if a chain link fence is the right choice for you.

Remember, gates, posts, braces, and latches may be required to finish your fence.

Not sure if chain link fencing is the look you want? Check out our definitive guide on fences!

Before you start any fencing project, you’ll want to make sure that you’re building your fence on the proper lot. Check your property lines before you get started; it won’t do to end up with your fence encroaching on your neighbor’s property!

Check all the local and HOA guidelines for fencing. You may need a permit, or your choices may be limited by the HOA. With the proper planning and research, you won’t end up with half a fence built that you’ll need to tear down and move or replace due to property line issues or HOA guidelines for appearance.

We hope you’ll enjoy this guide and our other articles on fences!

Here's an interesting take on a chain link fence. The whole of the property is surrounded by a tall wooden privacy fence, but divided down the middle with a much shorter chain link fence to denote separate outdoor living areas.

Here’s an interesting take on a chain link fence. The whole of the property is surrounded by a tall wooden privacy fence, but divided down the middle with a much shorter chain link fence to denote separate outdoor living areas.

Source: Zillow Digs™

In a backyard, a chain link fence can be used to separate your landscaping from your neighbor's yard, keep pets in (or out!) and generally mark the borders of your yard. To beautify a plain chain link fence, add colorful planting beds and sculptures. You might even see some fuzzy friends, like the squirrels above!

In a backyard, a chain link fence can be used to separate your landscaping from your neighbor’s yard, keep pets in (or out!) and generally mark the borders of your yard. To beautify a plain chain link fence, add colorful planting beds and sculptures. You might even see some fuzzy friends, like the squirrels above!

Here we see a great example of a yard that utilizes the low-cost chain link fence for the parts of the yard that aren't visible from the street. The front of of the home's fence is brick with a lattice border, while the rest is slatted chain link for more privacy. This is a perfect way to embrace the low cost option of chain link while keeping up the curb appeal!


Here we see a great example of a yard that utilizes the low-cost chain link fence for the parts of the yard that aren’t visible from the street. The front of of the home’s fence is brick with a lattice border, while the rest is slatted chain link for more privacy. This is a perfect way to embrace the low cost option of chain link while keeping up the curb appeal!

Source: Zillow Digs™

In older city neighborhoods, it's more common to see chain link fencing at the front of the home. The fence doesn't obstruct the front of the home, which is great for displaying the beauty of this aged brick.

In older city neighborhoods, it’s more common to see chain link fencing at the front of the home. The fence doesn’t obstruct the front of the home, which is great for displaying the beauty of this aged brick.

In well-established backyard gardens, a chain link fence can be used like a trellis, effectively adding privacy with large flowering plants, like these beautiful lavender wisteria.

In well-established backyard gardens, a chain link fence can be used like a trellis, effectively adding privacy with large flowering plants, like these beautiful lavender wisteria.

Even if you don't have plants that will grow up and through the fencing like a trellis, you can still plant large, leggy flowers like this wild yellow daisy variant. The colorful blooms and sheer size will camouflage a plain fence.

Even if you don’t have plants that will grow up and through the fencing like a trellis, you can still plant large, leggy flowers like this wild yellow daisy variant. The colorful blooms and sheer size will camouflage a plain fence.

This modern home has a large horizontal slat wooden privacy fence around the main outdoor backyard living area, but uses a tall chain link fence to secure the boundaries of the rest of the property.
Tropical home with chain link fence with hedge
Here’s a good example of a chain link fence concealed with a hedge.  If you opt for a chain link fence for your home, this is a great way to make it prettier while still enjoying the low cost protection these fences offer.

Related Galleries & Rooms You May Like:

26 Cheery White Picket Fence Ideas and Designs | How to Design and Build a Wooden Gate (Illustrated Guide) | 40 Beautiful Garden Fence Ideas | 51 Fence Designs and Ideas (Backyard & Front Yard)

(c) 2015

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.