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25 Beautiful Bell-Shaped Flowers

A variety of bell-shaped flowers.

Bell-shaped flowers come in an array of sizes, shapes, and colors and are easy to grow and take care of. They make a great groundcover flower as well as potted plants and cut flowers for wedding bouquets, centerpieces, and wreaths for any style or occasion.

Bellflowers come in many shapes, sizes, and colors and can be used in your landscaping, in pots around your deck or porch, or enjoyed as you take a country drive and take them in as they line the roads and ditches.

There are seven different families of bellflowers and most can survive in full sunlight with only a moderate amount of water. Most of the bellflowers can grow in any type of soil which makes them an easy plant to take care of if you are growing them yourself at home. Here is a list of 25 of the  most popular and beautiful bellflowers available to you.

Peach-Leaf Bellflower (Campanula persicifolia ‘La Bell)

A close look at purple Peach-Leaf Bellflowers.

This gorgeous, showy flower will do well if placed in full sunlight or partial shade. Its water preference is a moderate amount and it can be used for a variety of things, such as groundcover and naturalization. It also works great as a cut flower. It attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds and is pollinated by itself, beetles, moths and butterflies, and bees.

The Peach-Leaf Bellflower self-fertilizes, is suitable for winter sowing, and does well when transplanted. You can sow the seeds of this flower in containers in a cold frame during the springtime to re-plant outside after the last frost.

Spanish Bellflower (Campanula primulifolia ‘Lee Neff’)

A look at clusters of Spanish Bellflower.

The Spanish Bellflower is a showy, beautiful flower that can be used as groundcover or as a cut flower and will come up year after year. You should plant this type of flower in a location where it can receive full sun or only be partially shaded. These flowers attract butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds and need a moderate amount of water.

You can sow these flowers indoors in the winter and springtime as they do well when transplanted and will grow in containers that are at least one gallon in size. These are beautiful flowers to use in a fresh cut flower arrangement for a dinner table or wedding bouquet.

Dwarf Bellflower (Campanula punctata ‘Little Punky’)

A close look at white Dwarf Bellflowers.

Only needing a moderate amount of water, dwarf bellflowers will grow well in partial shade or full sunlight. They are a beautiful, showy flower that are great for using as groundcover or freshly cut flowers. They will come up again year after year and can handle transplanting very well. They attract hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies so they are great for planting near a porch or gazebo so you can enjoy the action. They self-fertilize and are suitable for winter sowing.

Milky Bellflower (Campanula lactiflora ‘Loddon Anna’)

 

A bee feeding on a Milky Bellflower.

The Milky Bellflower is pink in color and very showy and pretty. It grows well in full or partial sunlight and needs a moderate amount of water. It will reach about 32 inches in height but as groundcover, it will spread about 38 inches.

This magnificent flower attracts hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees and makes a great cut flower. This particular bellflower sself-fertilizes and will come up every year. It is suitable for winter sowing and can handle transplanting like a champ!

Italian Bellflower (Campanula isophylla ‘Mayi’)

A cluster of Italian Bellflowers.

The Italian Bellflower has many other names, including Falling Stars and Star of Bethlehem. It grows well in full sunlight or partial shade. It can be grown easily in one to three-gallon containers and is fine for winter sowing.

It does well after being transplanted and can be used for groundcover or as a fresh, cut flower. It will come up year after year for you to enjoy without the hassle of replanting. It also attracts bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies which are fun to observe.

White Bellflower (Campanula alliariifolia)

A close look at a garden of White Bellflowers.

The White Bellflower also referred to as the spurred bellflower, Cornish Bellflower, or Ivory Bells is a beautiful perennial flower that grows well in full sun, partial shade or partial or dappled shade which provides a lot of options for planting. This flower only needs a moderate amount of water and will grow to a height of between two and four feet.

It blooms in late spring to early summer and its bloom size is about two inches. It is great to be used as a cut flower or ground cover and will come up again next year. It can be grown in containers during their winter then transplanted in the spring after the last frost. It can self-pollinate or be pollinated by beetles, moths, butterflies, flies, and bees.

You have a lot of options as to where to plant the White Bellflower since it can be grown in poor soil. This gorgeous flower attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds to your property for you to enjoy.

Alpine Bellflower (Campanula alpestris)

A cluster of Alpine Bellflower in bloom.

The Alpine Bellflower, also known as the Large-Flowered Bellflower and Allioni’s Bell, will only grow to about six inches tall at the most. It is slow-spreading and grows well in full sun or partial shade. It is usually a lavender in color and flowers in late spring to early summer. It is best grown in Alpine Gardening areas and is can be used as a groundcover that will spring up every year.

It attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds and can handle being transplanted. You can grow indoors during the winter in a one-gallon or three gallons or larger container but you must have excellent drainage while it is potted. This beautiful flower will look lovely in a wedding bouquet or landscape flower.

Tall American Bellflower (Campanula americana)

A close look at a cluster of Tall American Bellflowers.

The Tall American Bellflower is also known simply as the American Bellflower, Tall Bellflower, or Bluebell and is a biennial plant. It grows best in full sun to partial shade or partial to dappled shade. It can grow in a very wet area or dry and only needs a moderate amount of water. It is tall, which is obvious by its name, and will grow to become four to six feet high. It is a blue-lavender in color which makes it a great flower for centerpieces for any occasion.

It is a great cut flower and can also be used as a groundcover. It attracts beautiful butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees and you can begin growing it during the winter months indoors as it can handle transplanting. You should grow it in containers that are at least three gallons in size.

Marsh Bellflower (Campanula aparinoides)

Clusters of Marsh Bellflower growing by the road.

You might find a Marsh Bellflower growing alongside a country road on a leisurely Sunday drive as it grows well in a wet or damp environment, such as a ditch or swamp. It is sometimes even referred to as a Swamp Bellflower or Bedstraw Bellflower. It is a showy, pretty flower that acts as a groundcover, comes up every year, and can be used as a cut flower for bouquets and centerpieces. It attracts bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies and is suitable for winter sowing and transplanting.

Bearded Bellflower (Campanula barbata)

A close look at a single Bearded Bellflower.

The Bearded Bellflower grows well in full sun or partial shade and is a beautiful lavender color. It is small and only grows to about an inch if that tall. It blooms in late spring to early summer and has a taproot. It is best for Alpine Gardening and works best as a ground cover that comes up every year, attracting bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies. It is suitable for winter sowing and can handle being transplanted.

Birch-leaved Bellflower (Campanula betulifolia)

A cluster of Birch-leaved Bellflower in a backyard.

You might find this pretty bellflower growing in the middle of a sunny meadow on a beautiful spring or summer day. It needs full sunlight to grow well or at least a partial amount of sunshine. It is a groundcover flower and can be cut to use in a flower arrangement. It attracts hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies and can handle being transplanted if you want to grow it yourself in the wintertime to plant outside in the spring.

Carpathian Bellflower (Campanula carpatica)

A garden of Carpathian Bellflowers.

The Carpathian Bellflower is also known by the names of Carpathian Harebell and Tussock Bellflower. It is a perennial herb that needs a moderate amount of water and thrives best in Zone 8b. It will grow to about a foot tall and needs full sun or at least partial sun and also does well with dappled shade. It is a showy blue or white flower that blossoms in late spring, summer, or throughout the spring and summer.

It is best if grown in an Alpine Gardening location and used as a ground cover or cut flower. It will become an annual flower and attracts butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees. It makes a great flower for your landscaping, especially in the border around sidewalks, patios, or driveways. It self-fertilizes but needs a specific temperature of about 65 degrees Fahrenheit to do well. It germinates in one to three weeks and its depth to plant seed is only at surface level.

It is a suitable plant for winter sowing and can be started indoors. Its pollinators include moths, butterflies, bees, flies, itself, and beetles. You can grow it in a one-gallon to three-gallon containers or even larger. It can be grown in poor soil conditions.

Kashmir Bellflower (Campanula cashmeriana)

A look inside a Kashmir Bellflower with a bee.

The Kashmir Bellflower needs full sun to partial shade to do its best and works great as a groundcover or cut flower that will return every year. It is suitable to grow indoors in the winter months in a one-gallon or larger container that needs a moderate amount of water and can handle transplanting without much of an issue.

It attracts beautiful butterflies and hummingbirds as well as the all-important bees. This is a larger, beautiful flower that will look great in your landscaping or in a fresh vase of flowers for your table.

Adriatic Bellflower (Campanula fenestrellata)

A close look at a cluster of Adriatic Bellflower blooming.

This blue-colored gorgeous groundcover flower only needs a moderate amount of water to grow and flourish. It can be found in fields or alongside a beautiful country pond and adds brilliant color to any landscape. It attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds while welcoming moths, butterflies, bees, flies, and beetles for pollination. This flower can also self-pollinate and can be grown during the winter months indoors. It also can handle transplantation.

Clustered Bellflower (Campanula glomerata)

A bee feeding on a Clustered Bellflower.

Native to Europe, this beautiful flower can be grown in trays indoors than transplanted outside in early spring. It needs full sunlight and does not cope well with shade. It works best as a plug plant for landscaping and is also known by the name of Dane’s Blood. It sports evergreen leaves and is a beautiful shade of purple.

It needs a moderate amount of water to grow well and its bloom size is about two inches in diameter. It spreads by underground runners and flowers in late spring or early summer. It self-germinates after a cold period and is suitable for winter sowing and transplanting. It can grow in any type of soil as long as it has a water supply.

Wide-leaved Bellflower (Campanula latifolia subsp. latifolia)

Clusters of blooming Wide-leaved Bellflower.

The Wide-Leaved Bellflower is suitable as an annual in your landscaping or along your driveway. It grows well as a groundcover or as a cut flower and can be started indoors if you stratify seeds for three weeks first. It is suitable for winter sowing and can handle being transplanted. It attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds and blooms in late spring to early summer.

It grows best in Zone 8b and will reach a plant height of only about 100 centimeters with a 30-centimeter spread. It needs full sun or only partial or dappled shade to thrive.

Mountain harebell (Campanula lasiocarpa)

A cluster of Mountain harebell growing in the wild.

This wildflower can grow in rugged soil and can be found near mountains and lakes. It is sometimes referred to as the Alaska Harebell and needs full sun to partial shade to grow and thrive. It needs a moderate amount of water and is a beautiful blue. It will add a pop of color to any landscape or bouquet. It blooms in late spring or early summer and does best in an Alpine Gardening location.

It is a groundcover and will continue to come up year after year, attracting bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. It self-fertilizes and can also be fertilized by beetles, moths, butterflies, bees, and flies. It can be grown indoors in the wintertime and transplanted outside in the spring.

Large Campanula (Campanula latifolia)

A look at clusters of deep purple Large Campanula.

This Bellflower grows best in USDA plant hardiness zones 4 and up but may grow in zone 3 with some protection. It is a cold flower which means it can survive rough winters although they need plenty of sun to flower in the spring and summer months. It is a beautiful flower that grows to about two inches in bloom.

It is also known as the Giant Bellflower and needs a well-drained area to grow with a moderate amount of moisture. Its pollinators include itself, beetles, bees, flies, moths, and butterflies and are can be grown indoors in at least one-gallon containers.

Spreading Bellflower (Campanula patula)

A garden filled with Spreading Bellflower.

Spreading bellflower is native to certain parts of Europe and has become widely naturalized elsewhere. This beautiful groundcover flower can be found in meadows, river and creek banks, open woodland areas, clearings in wooded areas, alongside country roads and other roadways, fallow fields, and even waste ground.

It boasts star-shaped, pale violet-blue flowers and will give your landscaping a pop of gorgeous color. It thrives best in full sunlight and can be transplanted and winter sowed. It attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds and can be grown indoors in containers that are at least one-gallon in size.

Shiny-leaved Bellflower (Campanula pilosa)

A cluster of Shiny-Leaved Bellflower.

Source: SkalnickyPelikan

First found in the Alps, this showy, gorgeous groundcover flower will come back every year and attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. It is suitable for winter sowing in containers that are at least one-gallon in size. It is great for landscaping and only needs a moderate amount of water to survive and thrive.

Dalmatian Bellflower (Campanula portenschlagiana)

A look at a potted Dalmatian Bellflower.

This very popular bellflower is great for filling the spaces between stepping stones in your garden or walkway and look beautiful spilling over a retaining wall. They will add a beautiful array of blue or purple flowers with dark green leaves to your landscaping.

They are also known as the Adria Bellflower or Wall Bellflower and are a herbaceous perennial flower that will grow to nearly six inches tall and nearly a foot wide. They need a medium amount of moisture in well-drained soil and bloom in the spring every year.

Serbian Bellflower (Campanula poscharskyana)

A cluster of blooming Serbian Bellflower.

The Serbian Bellflower, also known as the Trailing Bellflower or Poscharsky’s Bellflower, boasts a pale violet-blue flower that is shaped like a star and about one inch in diameter. It will bloom freely in late spring to early summer and makes a great ground cover for your landscaping.

It needs a moderate amount of water to survive and tolerates poor soil conditions. It attracts several insects and is pollinated by itself along with bees, beetles, moths, butterflies, and flies.

Spotted Bellflower (Campanula punctate)

A look at four pink Spotted Bellflowers.

The Spotted Bellflower is a beautiful clump-forming flower that sports heart-shaped foliage and a tubular, bell-shaped flower in a white or dusty pink color with red spots. It grows to about a foot tall and is native to Japan and Siberia. It grows well in partial shade or full sunlight and is also known by the name of Chinese Rampion. It needs a moderate amount of water to grow and flourish and is self-fertilizing.

Chimney Bellflower (Campanula pyramidalis)

A close look at a cluster of Chimney Bellflower.

With star-shaped blue, pink, or lavender flowers and the potential to grow to six feet tall, the Chimney Bellflower looks great in a large pot on your patio or front porch. It needs a moderate amount of water and full sunlight or partial or dappled shade to grow and thrive. It boasts semi-evergreen leaves and blossoms in late summer to early fall. It can grow in most types of soil but is best if grown in dark, rich soil.

Rainier Harebell (Campanula raineri)

A cluster of Rainier Harebell.

Native to the Swiss and Italian Alps, this beautiful bellflower blossoms in the summer, boasting lavender-blue, bell-shaped flowers, and evergreen leaves. It needs full sunlight and since it can be grown in chalky or sandy soils, it can actually grow in your stone driveway. Its USDA zones include 4 through 9 and it can be grown indoors then transplanted but it must have adequate water drainage to survive.

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